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  • Woman recants allegations against 49ers LB Foster
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    The former girlfriend of San Francisco 49ers linebacker Reuben Foster says she can prove Foster did not cause her injuries in an alleged domestic violence incident, according to multiple reports Wednesday.

    • Elissa Ennis released a statement through her attorney saying she can prove Foster was not responsible for injuries she sustained in February. Instead, the injuries resulted from a fight with another woman, said attorney Stephanie Rickard.

      There is a video of that fight with another woman, Rickard said, adding that Foster tried to end the relationship with Ennis after learning of the incident.

      "She was extremely upset and told him if he broke up with her she would ‘trash his career,'" Rickard said.

      The Santa Clara County District Attorney's office filed charges against Foster, 24, on April 12 stemming from a Feb. 11 incident. He faces two charges of domestic violence and one felony charge of possession of an assault weapon. He is also charged with attempting to prevent a victim from reporting a crime, another felony.

      The DA's office said Foster bruised Ennis and ruptured her eardrum. Ennis told investigators at the scene that Foster struck her in the head eight to 10 times, a statement Rickard says Ennis made untruthfully.

      "Ennis apologizes to everyone that may have been harmed in this case, especially Mr. Foster," Rickard said.

      Foster is scheduled to appear in court for the matter on Monday morning.

      49ers general manager John Lynch told reporters this past Monday that the club would release Foster if the domestic violence allegation proved to be true. The team announced earlier this month that Foster would not join his teammates at the team's offseason workout program or its minicamp in June while dealing with his legal matter.

      Foster is also facing a second-degree marijuana possession charge in Tuscaloosa, Ala., where he played in college for the Crimson Tide, after a Jan. 12 arrest.

      Considered a top-10 prospect in the 2017 draft, Foster slid to the 31st overall pick due to medical and character concerns.

      --Field Level Media

  • NFL: No evidence RB Guice was asked inappropriate questions
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    After conducting an investigation into the matter for weeks, the NFL announced Wednesday that it found no evidence that teams asked former LSU running back Derrius Guice inappropriate personal questions at the NFL Scouting Combine in March.

    • On Sirius XM radio on March 7, Guice was asked about the combine interview process and said, "Some people are really trying to get in your head and test your reaction. ... I go in one room, and a team will ask me do I like men, just to see my reaction. I go in another room, they'll try to bring up one of my family members or something and tell me, 'Hey, I heard your mom sells herself. How do you feel about that?'"

      League spokesman Brian McCarthy released a statement Wednesday, reading:

      "Following reports concerning the interviews of Derrius Guice at the Scouting Combine, the League conducted a thorough investigation which included a formal review and report from every club that interviewed Mr. Guice during the Combine, as well as discussions with Mr. Guice, his agent and others. The investigation did not confirm that any club made the reported inquiries. Nonetheless, we used this opportunity to reaffirm our workplace standards and emphasize the importance of fully complying with all requirements of federal and state law. The NFL and each of its member clubs remain fully committed to fair and non-discriminatory employment practices."

      Guice, 20, is widely expected to be picked in the first or second round of the 2018 NFL Draft, and could be the second running back off the board after Penn State's Saquon Barkley.

      According to ESPN, the league spent weeks trying to figure out who asked Guice such questions, while at least one team said Guice "made up" the comments.

      An NFL.com story on Friday noted that Guice has "indicated privately and to teams those questions weren't really asked by NFL teams." The story -- which reported via multiple sources that teams have concerns regarding the running back's maturity -- quoted an executive saying, "His explanation was that it was taken out of context. There's just a lot going on with him."

      The NFL issued a statement at the time of Guice's radio comments, reading:

      "A question such as that is completely inappropriate and wholly contrary to league workplace policies. The NFL and its clubs are committed to providing equal employment opportunities to all employees in a manner that is consistent with our commitment to diversity and inclusion, state and federal laws and the CBA. We are looking into the matter. The league annually reminds clubs of these workplace policies that prohibit personnel from seeking information concerning a player's sexual orientation."

      In March of 2016, Atlanta Falcons defensive coordinator Marquand Manuel -- who was a defensive backs coach at the time -- issued an apology for asking Ohio State cornerback prospect Eli Apple at the combine if he liked men, prompting the NFL to reinforce its policies about inappropriate questions.

      --Field Level Media

  • Childress, Vick to head AAF's Atlanta franchise
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    The Alliance of American Football's Atlanta franchise will have two familiar faces on the coaching staff when play kicks off next February.

    • Former Minnesota Vikings head coach Brad Childress will be Atlanta's head coach, and his offensive coordinator will be former Atlanta Falcons quarterback Michael Vick.

      Atlanta becomes the second confirmed market for AAF, which previously announced an Orlando franchise. Former University of Florida coach Steve Spurrier is set to be the head coach in Orlando.

      The Atlanta Journal-Constitution pointed out the coincidence of the timing of Vick's hiring: 11 years to the day from when Vick's Virginia property was raided in an investigation into dog fighting. Vick wound up serving 21 months in a federal prison before resuming his NFL career.

      Last season, Vick was a coaching intern with the Kansas City Chiefs, with Childress serving as the team's assistant head coach under Andy Reid.

      "I've always had a passion for teaching, a passion for coaching," Vick said Wednesday. "When Brad called me about this opportunity, I felt like it was obviously something I couldn't pass up."

      Childress left the Chiefs in January, then signed on to be an offensive analyst for the Chicago Bears -- where former Chiefs offensive coordinator Matt Nagy was hired as the new head coach -- in late February.

      "This is his team," Vick said of Childress, according to ESPN. "I'm just a guy here to help players develop. Obviously to dive into the offense and make suggestions, be a crutch for Coach, but we're going to follow his lead. When he thinks I'm ready, I'll graduate to the next level along with everybody else."

      Childress, 61, produced a 39-35 record as head coach of the Vikings from 2006-10, leading Minnesota to the NFC Championship Game after the 2009 season. He also has served as offensive coordinator of the Philadelphia Eagles and the Chiefs.

      The AAF Atlanta team will play at Georgia State Stadium. The league is expected to include eight teams, with former UCLA coach Rick Neuheisel a possibility to lead a Southern California squad, according to multiple media reports.

      --Field Level Media

  • NFL notebook: Audio from confidential NFL meeting discussing Trump revealed
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    An audio tape of a confidential meeting last October reveals that NFL owners were highly concerned about President Donald Trump's comments that were critical of players kneeling during the national anthem.

    • The New York Times reports that it obtained the audio recording of the three-hour session in which owners, players and executives discussed the comments and felt Trump's words were fueling an unprecedented amount of backlash against the league. The meeting was held at a time when TV ratings were dropping, and fans and sponsors were expressing outrage over the high number of players kneeling in peaceful protest during the playing of the national anthem.

      The summit was set up and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell began the session this way: "Let's make sure that we keep this confidential." Six months later, the details are out.

      New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, a longtime personal friend of Trump, was highly critical of the president, while Philadelphia Eagles owner called Trump's presidency "disastrous" and said "we've got to be careful not to be baited by Trump or whomever else." Then-San Francisco 49ers safety Eric Reid and Philadelphia Eagles defensive end Chris Long both spoke in favor of Colin Kaepernick being on an NFL team, while Houston Texans owner Bob McNair urged players to stop kneeling.

      --The Cleveland Browns are expected to pass on USC quarterback Sam Darnold with the No. 1 pick in Thursday's NFL draft, according to Mary Kay Cabot of cleveland.com.

      The Browns have apparently "cooled" on the 20-year-old Darnold and are instead focused on either Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield or Wyoming's Josh Allen.

      Browns general manager John Dorsey hasn't tipped his hand in recent weeks, telling reporters last Thursday that he remains open to "all options" with the No. 1 and No. 4 overall picks. Most considered Darnold the favorite to go No. 1 for the last several weeks, but Allen's name has gained steam recently. Meanwhile, Browns head coach Hue Jackson told reporters last Tuesday that all four top quarterbacks -- Darnold, Allen, Mayfield and UCLA's Josh Rosen -- remain in play for Cleveland.

      --Former Dallas Cowboys wide receiver Dez Bryant declined a multi-year offer from the Baltimore Ravens, according to Dallas-based reporter Ed Werder.

      Per Werder, Bryant would prefer to sign a lucrative one-year deal, then prove himself on the field and lock up a monster deal as a free agent in 2019.

      The Ravens decided not to give Bryant a one-year offer, opting instead to sign New Orleans Saints restricted free agent wideout Willie Snead to a two-year offer sheet. The Saints chose not to match, making Snead a Raven, and Baltimore is reportedly no longer interested in Bryant.

      --The doctor for Ohio State center Billy Price notified NFL teams by letter that Price's pectoral injury will be fully healed by the start of training camps in late July.

      Price, who is rated as the 34th overall prospect and second-best center by Field Level Media for this week's NFL draft, suffered a pectoral injury while weightlifting during the NFL combine and underwent surgery on March 6.

      Dr. David Altchek provided the update for Price's current health status: "William Price is now 2 months status post left shoulder pectoralis repair," Altchek wrote. "He has already attained full shoulder motion and has no deformity. His prognosis is for full recovery. It is anticipated that he will be able to participate in the NFL training camp at the end of July without restriction."

      --The New Orleans Saints will honor late owner Tom Benson with an empty chair in their NFL draft war room this week. Benson, who also owned the NBA's New Orleans Pelicans, died in March at the age of 90.

      "We'll be thinking about him (during the draft) for sure. I've tried not to think about that. We miss him on a daily basis," said Saints general manager Mickey Loomis at a press conference on Wednesday.

      The Saints, who went 11-5 last season and won the NFC South, pick 27th in Thursday's first round.

      --The Atlanta Falcons have picked up the fifth-year option of defensive end Vic Beasley, the team announced.

      Beasley, 25, is set to make $2.4 million in 2018, the fourth year of his rookie contract. The fifth-year option -- which is guaranteed for injury only -- will pay him the average of the top-10 salaries at his position in 2019, a figure currently pegged at $14.2 million.

      That number would be slightly lower if Beasley is classified as a linebacker, where he spent more time in 2016 and 2017, but he is expected to move back to defensive end full-time in 2018.

      --Field Level Media

  • Falcons pick up DE Beasley's fifth-year option
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    The Atlanta Falcons have picked up the fifth-year option of defensive end Vic Beasley, the team announced Wednesday.

    • Beasley, 25, is set to make $2.4 million in 2018, the fourth year of his rookie contract. The fifth-year option -- which is guaranteed for injury only -- will pay him the average of the top-10 salaries at his position in 2019, a figure currently pegged at $14.2 million.

      That number would be slightly lower if Beasley is classified as a linebacker, where he spent more time in 2016 and 2017, but he is expected to move back to defensive end full-time in 2018.

      The eighth overall pick in 2015, Beasley has 24.5 sacks through three seasons, with 15.5 coming during a 2016 campaign in which he earned first-team All-Pro honors. He finished 2017 with 5.0 sacks while missing two games.

      Beasley started just eight of 14 contests in 2017 and played fewer defensive snaps (485, 46.0 percent) than in either 2015 (539, 51.3) or 2016 (671, 60.4). He is expected to see more snaps with the move back to defensive end in 2018.

      --Field Level Media

  • Report: WR Bryant turned down multi-year deal with Ravens
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    Dez Bryant seems to be in no hurry to sign elsewhere following his release by the Dallas Cowboys.

    • The star wideout reportedly declined a multi-year offer from the Baltimore Ravens, according to Dallas based reporter Ed Werder.

      Bryant apparently would prefer to sign a lucrative one-year deal, then prove himself on the field and lock up a monster deal as a free agent in 2019.

      "Source: Former #Cowboys WR Dez Bryant turned down a multi-year offer from the #Ravens. He apparently wants a big 1-year deal and chance to secure bigger long-term contract as a UFA from beginning in 2019," Werder tweeted.

      The Ravens decided not to give Bryant a one-year offer, opting instead to sign New Orleans Saints restricted free agent wideout Willie Snead to a two-year offer sheet. The Saints chose not to match, making Snead a Raven, and Baltimore is reportedly no longer interested in Bryant.

      After signing a five-year, $70 million extension in July of 2015, Bryant was limited to 150 catches for 2,035 yards and 17 scores across three seasons, missing 10 games over that span due to injury. He totaled 273 catches for 3,935 yards and 41 scores over the previous three seasons while playing in every game. The Cowboys released him on April 13.

      Bryant told 247Sports.com last week that his decision "won't be about the money." He also reflected on his exit from Dallas, saying there were things he could have done differently.

      "I should've been better at controlling my emotions,'' Bryant said. "I should've been a better professional. I said I was going to work on that and that's what I am doing.

      "...(But) football means everything to me. I come from nothing. Football gave me life. It gave my family life. ... It's the love of my life.''

      --Field Level Media

  • Highly regarded C prospect Price making progress
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    The doctor for Ohio State center Billy Price notified NFL teams by letter on Wednesday that Price's pectoral injury will be fully healed by the start of training camps in late July.

    • Price, who is rated as the 34th overall prospect and second-best center by Field Level Media for this week's NFL draft, suffered a pectoral injury while weightlifting during the NFL combine and underwent surgery on March 6.

      Dr. David Altchek provided the update for Price's current health status.

      "William Price is now 2 months status post left shoulder pectoralis repair," Altchek wrote. "He has already attained full shoulder motion and has no deformity.

      "His prognosis is for full recovery. It is anticipated that he will be able to participate in the NFL training camp at the end of July without restriction."

      Price tore the pectoral during bench press drills at the NFL Scouting Combine on March 1.

      Price said he felt a pop on the left side of his chest during his third rep with the 225-pound bench. He immediately set the bar and walked off the stage. Price was evaluated by the Indianapolis Colts' medical staff and he said MRI results reviewed the following morning showed that it was not a complete tear.

      A four-year starter and two-time All-American for the Buckeyes, Price played left guard, right guard and center.

      Iowa's James Daniels is rated the top center by Field Level Media and the 22nd-best prospect.

      The three-day NFL draft beings Thursday at AT&T Stadium in Arlington, Texas.

      --Field Level Media

  • Saints to honor late owner Benson with chair in war room
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    The New Orleans Saints will honor late owner Tom Benson with an empty chair in their NFL draft war room this week.

    • Benson, who also owned the NBA's New Orleans Pelicans, died in March at the age of 90.

      "We'll be thinking about him (during the draft) for sure. I've tried not to think about that. We miss him on a daily basis," said Saints general manager Mickey Loomis at a press conference on Wednesday.

      The Saints, who went 11-5 last season and won the NFC South, pick 27th in Thursday's first round.

      Benson, a New Orleans native, purchased the Saints in 1985 when the team was on the brink of being sold and relocated. The franchise won its lone only Super Bowl championship under his ownership in 2009.

      The Saints went to the playoffs 11 times and won six division titles during Benson's tenure. New Orleans also hosted the Super Bowl five times during his ownership.

      The Saints are the 27th-most valuable franchise in the NFL at $2 billion according to Forbes as of 2017.

      Benson reportedly died peacefully at Ochsner Medical Center in Jefferson, La., with his wife Gayle Marie Benson by his side.

      Gayle Marie Benson took over the running of the family's sports empire, including both professional teams and Kentucky Derby hopeful Lone Sailor.

      --Field Level Media

  • Audio tape details NFL's concern over Trump's anthem jabs
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    An audio tape of a confidential meeting last October reveals that NFL owners were highly concerned about President Donald Trump's comments that were critical of players kneeling during the national anthem.

    • The New York Times reports that it obtained the audio recording of the three-hour session in which owners, players and executives discussed the comments and felt Trump's words were fueling an unprecedented amount of backlash against the league.

      The meeting was held at a time when TV ratings were dropping, and fans and sponsors were expressing outrage over the high number of players kneeling in peaceful protest during the playing of the national anthem.

      The increasing levels of unrest were fueled by Trump, who made the following comment at a late-September rally spot in Alabama:

      "Wouldn't you love to see one of these NFL owners, when somebody disrespects our flag, to say, 'Get that son of a (expletive) off the field right now. Out! He's fired. He's fired!'" Trump said.

      So the summit was set up and NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell began the session this way: "Let's make sure that we keep this confidential."

      Six months later, the details are out.

      New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, a longtime personal friend of Trump, was highly critical of the President. This despite contributing $1 million to the Trump campaign.

      "The problem we have is, we have a president (Trump) who will use (kneeling) as fodder to do his mission that I don't feel is in the best interests of America," Kraft said.

      Philadelphia Eagles owner Jeffrey Lurie used this word to describe Trump's presidency: "Disastrous."

      Lurie urged players to not become divided and warned that everybody needed to be cautious in their responses.

      "We've got to be careful not to be baited by Trump or whomever else," Lurie said.

      When the subject turned to former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, former teammate Eric Reid didn't mince words. He told the group of people in the room that the NFL was blackballing Kaepernick over his anthem stance.

      "I feel like he was hung out to dry," Reid said of Kaepernick. "Everyone in here is talking about how much they support us."

      Reid paused and the room was quiet in an awkward way. Then he continued.

      "Nobody stepped up and said 'we support Colin's right to do this.' " Reid said. "We all let him become Public Enemy No. 1 in this country, and he still doesn't have a job."

      Interestingly, Reid became a free agent following the 2017 campaign and interest has been minimal for a 26-year-old safety who was highly productive as a five-year starter. He had a recent meeting with the Cincinnati Bengals but the team opted not to offer a contract and he remains a free agent.

      Philadelphia Eagles defensive lineman Chris Long pointed out during the October meeting that Kaepernick not being on an NFL roster was troubling.

      "If he was on a roster right now, all this negativeness and divisiveness could be turned into a positive," Long said.

      Meanwhile, Houston Texans owner Bob McNair had one message for the players at the meeting: Stop kneeling.

      "You fellas need to ask your compadres, fellas, stop that other business, let's go out and do something that really produces positive results, and we'll help you," McNair said.

      --Field Level Media

  • 2018 NFL Draft: Penn State's Barkley headlines rich RB class
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    1. Saquon Barkley

    • Penn State

      6-0, 233, 40 time: 4.40

      Projection: First Round

      OVERVIEW

      Born in the Bronx, Barkley is the son of former WBC middleweight champion Iran Barkley. He moved to Pennsylvania, where he went on to become Mr. PA Football for Class AAA/AAA in 2014 while also winning the gold medal in the 100-meter dash.

      A four-star recruit, Barkley missed his first two games at Penn State in 2015 but still went on to rack up five 100-yard rushing games and was second in the nation among true freshmen with 1,076 yards. The following season, he led the Big Ten in all-purpose yards (140.86 yards per game) and 22 total touchdowns while finishing second with 1,496 rushing yards. Named a team captain before the 2017 season, Barkley went on to become the first FBS player since 2000 to top 1,000 rushing yards and 500 receiving yards in a season, and finished fourth in the Heisman Trophy voting.

      Barkley set numerous Penn State records before declaring early for the draft. He passed Larry Johnson as the program's career all-purpose yards leader (5,538), broke Lydell Mitchell's marks of 43 rushing and 53 total touchdowns and joined Evan Royster as the only Penn State players with three 1,000-yard rushing seasons.

      ANALYSIS

      Barkley is an outstanding all-around athlete and home-run threat as a runner, receiver and return man. He is extremely elusive with the ball in his hands, using his compact frame, quick feet and a variety of moves to escape blockers in the backfield or at the second level. Barkley has the vision and the lateral burst to get to the corner or exploit cut-back lanes and has more than enough speed to run away from would-be tacklers. He also displays solid hands and good route-running skills.

      If there are areas of his game to nitpick, Barkley needs to refine his pass blocking and become disciplined in following designed holes in the NFL, where trying to find the end zone on every carry will lead to more negative plays.

      2. Derrius Guice

      LSU

      5-10, 224, 40 time: 4.49

      Projection: First Round

      OVERVIEW

      Guice grew up in a tough part of Baton Rouge and his father was murdered when Guice was seven years old. Using football as an outlet, Guice rushed for 341 yards and 21 touchdowns as a senior at Catholic High School and earned MVP honors at the U.S. Army All-American game.

      The five-star recruit went on to rush for 436 yards and three touchdowns as a freshman backup to Leonard Fournette. With Fournette battling an ankle injury for much of the 2016 season, Guice racked up an SEC-best 1,387 rushing yards and 16 total touchdowns while averaging 7.6 yards per carry. He was also named the MVP of the Citrus Bowl.

      Guice battled nagging injuries in 2017 but still managed to rush for 1,251 yards and 11 touchdowns while adding 18 catches for 124 yards and two more scores in being named second-team All-SEC. He is one of only five players in LSU history to record consecutive seasons with 1,000-plus rushing yards and at least 10 rushing TDs. He decided to forgo his senior season, leaving as the fifth-leading rusher in program history with 3,074 yards.

      ANALYSIS

      Guice runs with a violent attitude and style, being credited with breaking 36 tackles and averaging 4.1 yards per carry after contact in 2017 by Pro Football Focus. He follows his blockers with patience to allow holes to develop and then accelerating through them. He will also pick up plenty of extra yardage after contact and displays passion in his running.

      Guice lacks the true breakaway gear of some of the other backs in this draft. And while he breaks a slew of tackles, he also takes on too much contact rather than eluding it. If Guice is able to stay healthy in the NFL with his physical style, he could quickly emerge as a Pro Bowl back.

      3. Sony Michel

      Georgia

      5-11, 214, 40 time: 4.54

      Projection: Second Round

      OVERVIEW

      With 6,659 rushing yards in high school and a number of awards bearing his name, Michel was one of the prized recruits of the 2014 class. He joined Todd Gurley, Keith Marshall and Nick Chubb to form a dominant backfield in 2014. Michel had his chance to see the field as a sophomore when Chubb went down with a serious knee injury, accounting for 1,161 rushing yards in 2015. Despite only four starts his final two years in Athens, he played a significant role in the Georgia offense.

      As a senior, Michel rushed for 7.9 yards per carry and led the team with 16 rushing touchdowns, running at his best in the College Football Playoff against Oklahoma (181 rushing yards) and Alabama (98 rushing yards).

      ANALYSIS

      A shifty runner between the tackles, Michel doesn't waste time attacking run lanes and bursting to the second level of the defense. He does an excellent job reading his blockers and finding creases, creating burst off his plant foot to string moves together. Michel would benefit from added patience to his run style and can outrun his blockers. However, in some schemes, the same urgency that made him special and productive in college will be a benefit.

      Michel typically took the field in third-down situations because he was a trusted blocker and receiver. Scouts question his ball security after Michel fumbled 12 times in four seasons. Durability is another major ding on the scouting report. However, Michel has all the ingredients of a NFL starting back.

      4. Ronald Jones II

      Southern Cal

      5-11, 205, 40 time: 4.65

      Projection: Second Round

      OVERVIEW

      Jones arrived at Southern Cal as a football and track star out of McKinney, Texas, and made an immediate impact as a freshman, rushing for a team-high 987 yards to break Charles White's 39-year-old school freshman rushing record. Jones also earned honorable mention All-Pac-12 honors.

      He took over the starting job when Justin Davis was injured in the middle of the 2016 season and went on lead the team with 1,082 rushing yards while scoring 13 total touchdowns. He had four 100-yard efforts while starting the final six regular-season games and made second-team All-Pac-12. He also spent some time with the USC track team in 2016.

      Jones saved his best for what would prove to be farewell season with the Trojans, rushing for 1,550 yards and 19 touchdowns in 2017. He earned first-team all-conference honors and decided to forgo his senior year to enter the draft.

      ANALYSIS

      Jones, who dealt with a nagging hamstring injury throughout the pre-draft process, is an explosive athlete who accelerates to and through the hole. His track speed also enables him to get to the outside and challenge the pursuit angles of defenders. He often does so by moving from the inside to the outside without losing speed, and he can stop on a dime to make defenders miss. Jones runs with good instincts, setting up his moves downfield and is willing to meet defenders when necessary.

      While he can play physical and is a willing - if marginally effective - blocker in blitz pickup, Jones lacks the ideal frame for an every-down back in the NFL and durability could be a concern. He needs to improve his production between the tackles and show that he is more than a check-down option in the passing game, but Jones is a proven playmaker who has drawn wide comparisons to former Chiefs star Jamaal Charles.

      5. Nick Chubb

      Georgia

      5-11, 227, 40 time: 4.52

      Projection: Second Round

      OVERVIEW

      With Todd Gurley and Keith Marshall atop the Georgia running back depth chart in 2014, Chubb wasn't expected to see the field as a true freshman. But Gurley and Marshall suffered season-ending injuries and Chubb beat out fellow freshman Sony Michel, emerging as one of the best backs in the country with 1,547 yards in his first season in Athens.

      His career track was altered by a gruesome knee injury in 2015 and Chubb never looked healthy in 2016. Chubb regained his bounce as a senior with a career-best 15 touchdowns, averaging 6.0 yards per carry for the 2017 SEC champions.

      ANALYSIS

      Built like a bruiser with a thick lower body, Chubb runs with outstanding balance and determination to stay on his feet through contact. Chubb marries his feet to his eyes to set up defenders with quick cuts, patching together his moves and forcing off-balanced tackle attempts. Chubb showed off his impressive lower-body power at the combine with 38.5-inch vertical and 10-feet-8 broad jump.

      With only four catches as a senior, Chubb is somewhat unproven as a receiving threat with Michel often handling the third-down duties for the Bulldogs. But as long as the doctors give the A-Okay with his surgically repaired knee, Chubb will be a solid day two running back target.

      6. Kerryon Johnson

      Auburn

      5-11 1/2, 213, 40 time: 4.52

      Projection: Second Round

      OVERVIEW

      Johnson's brother, Kerrron, is a professional basketball player in Europe and Kerryon was also an all-state player in high school. But it was the gridiron where he truly excelled. Johnson was named Mr. Football in Alabama after rushing for 1,659 yards and 25 touchdowns while leading Madison Academy to its third consecutive state title, and he chose Auburn over Alabama and several other top programs.

      Johnson saw significant action as a true freshman, rushing for 208 yards and three touchdowns, catching 14 passes and averaging 27.6 yards on 14 kickoff returns. Johnson built on that success in 2016 despite sharing the backfield with Kamryn Pettway, rushing for 895 yards and 11 touchdowns and averaging 22.3 yards on 12 kick returns.

      With Pettway limited by injury in 2017, Johnson emerged as the lead back. He earned first-team All-SEC honors after racking up 1,391 yards and 18 touchdowns to go along with 24 catches for 194 yards and his first two receiving touchdowns as a Tiger. Johnson did miss two games due to injury, but finished ninth in Heisman Trophy voting and opted to forgo his senior year.

      ANALYSIS

      Johnson shows great patience in the backfield to the extent that it could be a fault. He allows holes to develop and makes the quick decision to attack. He has also displayed good hands as a receiver and wants to stay on the field, even serving as a kick returning during his first two seasons.

      Johnson isn't especially elusive and will seek to drop his pads and pick up extra yards. Some of that is due to an inability to avoid contact in tighter spaces, and his upright running style gives some evaluators pause about his durability.

      He has all the tools to flourish as a three-down back in the NFL, with the biggest question perhaps being how long his body can hold up to the punishment.

      7. Rashaad Penny

      Running Back, San Diego State

      5-11, 220, 40 time: 4.46

      Projection: Second-Third round

      OVERVIEW

      It is uncommon to lose one 2,000-yard rusher and replace him with another one. But that's what happened at San Diego State, with Penny stepping into the spotlight to replace FBS all-time leading rusher Donnel Pumphrey.

      Pumphrey improved his production every season, even rushing for 1,005 yards and 11 touchdowns as a junior despite starting only one game. With Pumphrey in the NFL last season, Penny led the FBS with 2,248 rushing yards and 2,974 all-purpose yards, which earned him a top-five finish for the Heisman trophy.

      He finished his college career with a staggering 7.5 yards per carry average and 38 touchdowns, earning consensus All-American honors and conference Offensive Player of the Year as a senior.

      ANALYSIS

      Penny might not be elite in any one area, but he is solid across the board - vision, patience, balance, inside toughness. He finds slivers of daylight and hits them, bursting to the second level with force. Penny trusts the play design and doesn't waste time in the backfield.

      He has improved as a receiver, but his primary flaw is exposed in pass protection, missing blitzers and getting his quarterback hit. However, his value on special teams (tied the FBS record with seven kickoff returns and eight total returns) will be appealing to NFL teams. Penny might not be overly flashy, but he is durable, reliable and the production speaks for itself and he projects as a potential starter at the next level.

      8. Royce Freeman

      Oregon

      6-0, 229, 40 time: 4.54

      Projection: Third Round

      OVERVIEW

      Freeman came to Oregon from Imperial, Calif., seeking to continue the Ducks' pipeline of highly-productive running backs. He wasted no time in making an impact, earning first-team All-Pac-12 honors from multiple publications and being named the conference's Freshman Offensive Player of the Year after totaling 1,523 all-purpose yards and 18 touchdowns.

      Freeman broke LaMichael James' single-season school rushing record with 1,836 yards in 2015 while being the only FBS player in the country to amass at least 100 yards from scrimmage in every game. He again led Oregon with 945 yards as a junior but missed one game and was limited in several others by a knee injury.

      Oregon's offense continued to evolve through quarterback issues and a new coaching staff in 2017, but the big back looked more explosive than ever, rushing for 1,475 yards and 16 touchdowns and earning second-team all-conference honors. He leaves Eugene as one of only four players in FBS history to top 5,000 career rushing yards and 800 receiving yards.

      ANALYSIS

      Freeman is a big back with thick legs and excellent vision. He's not going to make a lot of would-be tacklers whiff and will struggle to win on the edge against the speed of NFL defenders. But as a North-South runner he is patient in seeking the hole and then attacks with aggressiveness. Not only is he a load to bring down, Freeman is adept at making the most of small spaces and surging through to drag tacklers.

      He put up solid receiving numbers in Oregon's offense, but Freeman is not an elite receiver out of the backfield and lacks the burst to outrun defenders. He could make a good living as a short-yardage runner at the next level. One of the primary concerns being 1,027 touches in college and already a history of some nagging injuries.

      9. Nyheim Hines

      NC State

      5-9, 198, 40 time: 4.38

      Projection: Fourth Round

      OVERVIEW

      Only the unfamiliar were surprised when Hines turned in a blistering 4.38 40-yard dash to lead all running backs at the NFL Scouting Combine. He was a two-sport star in high school who chose NC State in part because his twin sister, Nyah, received a track and field scholarship.

      Nyheim's track background was evident as a true freshman, when he produced a combined 1,419 all-purpose yards -- 243 rushing, 256 receiving and 920 as a kick returner. He followed that up by competing in sprint events and earning All-American and All-ACC honors.

      Hines played mostly the slot receiver position as a sophomore, catching 42 passes for 525 yards, but did not reach the end zone. He moved to the backfield as a junior, rushing for 1,113 yards and 12 touchdowns despite a midseason ankle injury, and won the Paul Hornung Award as the nation's top all-purpose back as well as first-team all-conference honors as a running back.

      Hines also finished his career with a 24.7-yard average on 88 kickoff returns, and opted to forgo his senior season for the NFL draft.

      ANALYSIS

      Hines is a multi-dimensional threat who will bring out the creativity in the right offensive coordinator. He has extensive experience in the backfield, as a slot returner and brings added versatility as a returner specialist. He possesses sprinter's speed and is a big play waiting to happen when he gets the ball in his hands in the open field.

      By the same token, he is an energizing athlete without a true position. He's not big enough for full-time duty in the backfield but is a better runner than receiver. Hines will attempt to pick up extra yardage but lacks the bulk to move the pile. He is a chance-of-pace back who could develop into a true multi-dimensional weapon in the right offense.

      10. Bo Scarbrough

      Alabama

      6-1 3/8, 228 40 time: 4.52

      Projection: Fourth Round

      OVERVIEW

      Video clips of Scarbrough bowling over tired would-be tacklers late in CFP games became commonplace over the past two seasons. The powerful runner spent his final year of high school at the IMG Academy in Florida, but hails from Tuscaloosa and it was no surprise that he chose to enroll at Alabama.

      Scarbrough missed four games of his freshman season due to an ACL injury and suspension, managing only 104 yards and one touchdown while watching Derrick Henry win the Heisman Trophy in a backfield that also included Kenyan Drake and Damien Harris.

      Scarbrough draws comparisons to Henry and he rushed for 812 yards and 11 touchdowns as a sophomore, including 273 and four scores in two CFP games despite a leg injury slowing him in the title game. He added 596 yards and eight touchdowns in 2017 before declaring early for the NFL draft.

      ANALYSIS

      Scarbrough is a beast out of the I-formation, taking the ball and delivering punishment to anyone in his way. He finishes nearly every run falling forward, creating extra yards with his powerful legs and big frame. He is a proven short-yardage and red-zone threat who also has the physique to stand up to oncoming blitzers, although his technique needs refinement.

      That big frame also presents a big target for defenders, and Scarbrough struggles to avoid contact. While he shared backfield duties and had a relatively light workload for a lead back, he does absorb a lot of big hits and durability is a clear concern following a slew of nagging injuries dating back to high school.

      Scarborough is a bear to bring down when he has a head of steam, but he isn't going to break away on his own and will do best in a one-cut scheme.

      11. John Kelly

      Tennessee

      5-9 7/8, 216, 40 time: 4.5

      Projection: Fourth Round

      OVERVIEW

      Kelly was a three-star recruit out of Michigan who scored touchdowns five different ways as a senior - rushing, receiving, kickoff return, punt return and interception return. He turned down offers from Michigan and Michigan State for an opportunity to play running back for the Vols, rushing for 166 yards and a touchdown as a freshman.

      In an offense that featured Alvin Kamara and Jalen Hurd (until he left the program midseason), Kelly led all Volunteers running backs with 630 yards on 98 carries with five touchdowns in 2016. With Kamara off to the NFL, Kelly set new career highs with 778 rushing yards and nine touchdowns in 2017 and was the only player from a "Power 5" program to lead his team in rushing yards and receptions.

      He chose to join a deep class of mid-round running backs in the 2018 NFL Draft rather than go through a coaching change entering his senior season.

      ANALYSIS

      Kelly's final grade will be left to the eye of the beholder. He is undersized, but as an aggressive runner with a low center of gravity he makes strong, decisive cuts and keeps his legs moving upon contact. However, he also lacks great vision or a separating gear, and left question marks about his true speed after not running the 40 at the NFL Scouting Combine; reports vary widely about his times at UT's pro day. Team interviews will also play a major factor with some concerns about his off-field decision-making.

      Kelly isn't an elite athlete, but he is a talented enigma as a one-year starter who got as much production as could be expected playing in a struggling offense in 2017. He projects as a backup with the potential to emerge as more with his competitive on-field attitude as a runner, receiver and blocker.

      12. Mark Walton

      Miami (Fla.)

      5-10, 202, 40 time: 4.50

      Projection: Fourth-Fifth Round

      OVERVIEW

      Walton overcame a difficult childhood during which his father was murdered, and his mother died last year. A four-star recruit, Walton decided to stay close to home and sign with the Hurricanes after helping lead Booker T. Washington to a state title.

      He led Miami with 10 total touchdowns as a true freshman and took over the starting job in 2016 and rushed for 1,117 yards and 14 touchdowns to earn third-team All-ACC honors. Walton got off to a blazing start in 2017, averaging 7.6 yards per carry and scoring three touchdowns before suffering an ankle injury in the fifth game that required season-ending surgery.

      Walton decided to forgo his senior year and declare for the draft, finishing his Miami career with 2,630 total yards and 28 touchdowns. The ankle was strong enough for Walton to participate at the Scouting Combine, where he ran a mediocre 4.60 40-yard dash. Pro day timings typically favor the athlete, but some scouts had him around 4.5 at Miami's March 28 workout.

      ANALYSIS

      Walton lacks size, but he does possess a strong lower body and runs with good balance. He will often make the first defender miss and isn't shy about lowering his pads to pick up extra yardage. Walton won't emerge as an every-down back unless he becomes more decisive between the tackles, but he does bring versatility as a potential third-down back with his excellent hands, big-play ability and willingness to protect his quarterback.

      Coming off an injury and in a deep running back class, Walton could slide down draft boards and prove a steal for a team seeking a combo back who can potentially contribute as a kick returner.

      13. Akrum Wadley

      Iowa

      5-9 5/8, 202, 40 time: 4.54

      Projection: Fifth-Sixth Round

      OVERVIEW

      Wadley was a two-sport and two-way star in Newark, N.J., competing in basketball and prep while also earning first-team all-county honors as a running back and defensive back. However, he garnered little interest from FBS programs, with Iowa offering him a scholarship shortly before signing day.

      That faith from the Hawkeyes would be rewarded. After redshirting in 2013, Wadley combined for 682 yards on 116 carries as the third-string back over the next two seasons. He moved up to the primary back behind LeShun Daniels in 2016 and lead the team with 1,081 yards on 168 carries while scoring 10 touchdowns.

      Wadley decided to return for his senior season with an opportunity to be the full-time starter. He responded with 1,109 yards on 252 carries with another 10 TDs while earning third-team All-Big Ten honors, averaging 4.4 yards per carry.

      ANALYSIS

      Wadley's best asset is nimble feet. While he can move a pile, he is an explosive runner who can make defenders look silly with his array of jump-cuts, jukes general ability to evade would-be tacklers. He can get to top speed quickly and has the burst to gain the edge. He also provides versatility as a receiver, even lining up in the slot.

      The athleticism is unquestioned. Wadley does lack ideal bulk, and his vision and anticipation to feel for where lanes are going to open leave something to be desired. He has bulk and versatility, but definitely has room to improve in his aggressiveness in picking up the blitz and his route running. Wadley projects as a dangerous weapon in a committee backfield.

      14. Kalen Ballage

      Arizona State

      6-1 ½, 228, 40 time: 4.46

      Projection: Fifth-Sixth Round

      OVERVIEW

      The Colorado native was a four-star recruit and Top 100 athlete who chose Arizona State over offers from several other Pac-12 schools and Power 5 programs after rushing for 2,690 yards and 35 touchdowns in high school.

      Ballage was used primarily as a short-yardage back as a true freshman, finishing with 138 yards and three touchdowns on the ground. His role increased in 2015 after overcoming mononucleosis, as Ballage logged 653 yards and four touchdowns on 125 carries (5.2 yards per carry). But it was during his junior season when Ballage made headlines. He had only one more carry than the previous season and produced 117 fewer yards on 4.3 yards per carry, but he also scored 15 TDs - including eight in a game against Texas Tech to tie the FBS single-game record.

      He set career highs with 157 carries and 669 yards as a senior, although his TDs dropped to six while his per-carry average remained at 4.3. Ballage split carries with Demario Richard each of the past two seasons, serving primarily as the third-down and goal-line back.

      ANALYSIS

      Ballage possesses excellent size and athleticism, as his workout numbers at the NFL Scouting Combine attest to -- 4.46 40, 122-inch broad jump, 6.91-second 3-cone drill and a 4.35-second short shuttle. He can also squat more than 500 pounds, and his ability to contribute as a receiver and return man will pique the interest of many teams seeking position versatility.

      While Ballage has a nose for the end zone, he lacks a good feel for recognizing when lanes are about to open and the decisiveness to attack them when he does. He's an outstanding athlete, but he's not extremely elusive and doesn't consistently break tackles.

      15. Josh Adams

      Notre Dame

      6-1 5/8, 213, 40 time: 4.48

      Projection: Fifth-Sixth Round

      OVERVIEW

      Adams recovered from a torn ACL during his junior year of high school in Pennsylvania to run track and earn all-state honors on the gridiron with 1,623 yards and 25 touchdowns. He chose Notre Dame over offers from Penn State and Stanford, among others, and rushed for 838 yards and six touchdowns as a backup to C.J. Prosise as a freshman.

      He increased his production to 933 yards on the ground and 193 receiving yards to go with six total touchdowns as a sophomore. But it was Adams' junior season that convinced him to leave early for the NFL draft after rushing for a career-high 1,430 yards and nine touchdowns, although his receiving numbers dipped to 13-101-0.

      ANALYSIS

      Adams is a powerful downhill runner who uses his strong legs to drive through contact and pick up extra yards. However, he lacks great acceleration or top-end speed, meaning he needs room to build up to top speed and gets into trouble when he runs east and west. His lack of speed really showed in a handful of games last season, including a lopsided loss at Miami.

      As would be expected, much of Adams' yards come after initial contact. He can bounce off linebackers - in part because he's often the same size. His production increased every season at Notre Dame, but his need to build up to stop speed while lacking a breakaway gear could make it difficult for Adams to land a regular role in an NFL backfield. He has also battled nagging injuries in addition to the ACL from high school, and played behind an outstanding offensive line at Notre Dame.

      16. Darrel Williams

      LSU

      6-0, 225, 40 time: 4.72

      Projection: Sixth Round

      OVERVIEW

      After rushing for 2,201 yards as a senior in high school, Williams didn't lack for college suitors.

      He chose to stay closer to home and signed with LSU as the second-best running back recruit in the state of Louisiana. However, the state's top-rated running back (Leonard Fournette) also signed with LSU, causing Williams to go be overshadowed.

      After Fournette moved on to the NFL, Derrius Guice filled the featured running back role, but Williams filled in due to injury and averaged 5.7 yards per carry and finished with 1,151 yards of total offense as a senior.

      ANALYSIS

      Williams has an NFL build and is a tough inside runner who isn't afraid to drop the pads and barrel through contact. He isn't a dynamic athlete and has below-average speed and burst for the position.

      Williams is a no-nonsense ballcarrier who gets north-south and resets his vision well on the move. The main appeal with him at the next level is the every-down potential. Williams has soft hands and natural receiving traits and holds his own as a blocker. He's as surehanded as they come when it comes to ball security. Somewhere on day three, a NFL team is going to get a diverse back capable of contributing early and often.

      17. Chase Edmonds

      Fordham

      5-9, 205, 40 time: 4.55

      Projection: Sixth Round

      OVERVIEW

      Edmonds left Fordham as the Patriot League's all-time leading rusher after accumulating the fifth-most rushing yards in FCS history with 5,862 over his four-year career. He is also the conference's all-time leader with 74 total touchdowns and 67 rushing touchdowns.

      It's incredible production for a player who did not receive a single FBS scholarship offer despite rushing for 2,378 yards and 25 touchdowns as a high school senior and being named the Mid-Penn Player of the Year. But he still garnered the attention of NFL scouts while tearing up the Patriots League, racking up a conference-record 7,374 career all-purpose yards despite battling injuries as a senior.

      Edmonds earned an invitation to the East-West Shrine Game and met with the Giants and Jets among other teams at the NFL Scouting Combine, where he ran a 4.55 40-yard dash.

      ANALYSIS

      Edmonds has a lot of experience, which is a double-edged sword with the miles already logged on his compact frame. He had the quickest short shuttle time at the combine, a testament to his acceleration and ability to reach the second level in a hurry. Despite his shorter stature, Edmonds will finish runs with toughness and has an excellent track record with ball security.

      The lack of elite straight-line speed is a concern with his impressive production coming against a lower level of competition. If he can improve his blocking and contribute as a receiver, Edmonds has the makings of a valuable change-of-pace back.

      18. Roc Thomas

      Jacksonville State

      5-10, 198, 40 time: 4.56

      Projection: Sixth-Seventh Round

      OVERVIEW

      Thomas was named Mr. Football in Alabama and the Gatorade Alabama Player of the Year after rushing for 2,211 yards and scoring 32 touchdowns as a senior. He was the No. 2 running back in the nation by Rivals and top five at his position by most all scouting services along with the likes of Leonard Fournette and Sony Michel. The five-star prospect was heavily recruited, ultimately picking Auburn over Alabama.

      He rushed for 214 yards and two touchdowns as the third-string back behind Cameron Artis-Payne and Corey Grant as a freshman, and 261 yards and one TD the following year. Still battling to earn significant playing time, Thomas requested his release after spring practices in 2016 and landed at Jacksonville State. He earned All-OVC honors after rushing for 782 yards and seven touchdowns as a junior, then set career highs with 178 carries for 1,065 yards and 13 TDs last season, earning conference Offensive Player of the Year.

      ANALYSIS

      It's easy to see from a physical perspective what made Thomas a five-star recruit. He has a good frame for the position along with excellent feet and good burst into the hole. He can run with patience, although that runs hot and cold, and has excellent athleticism to set up his moves to evade defenders. Thomas also brings value to the passing game, although he does need to display more consistent effort in pass pro.

      He battled nagging injuries early in his career at Auburn, contributing to his struggles to earn consistent playing time. The physical traits should get Thomas drafted. He's inconsistent now, but a patient coaching staff could unearth a complementary back with excellent big-play ability.

      19. Justin Jackson

      Northwestern

      6-0, 193, 40 time: 4.52

      Projection: Seventh Round

      OVERVIEW

      Jackson was rated as the No. 5 overall prospect in Illinois by Scout.com, and the four-star recruit made an immediate impact for NU. He rushed for 1,187 yards and 10 touchdowns as a true freshman to earn honorable mention All-Big Ten honors.

      He followed that up with 1,418 rushing yards and five touchdowns as a sophomore, 1,524-15 as a junior and 1,311-11 last season. Jackson leaves Northwestern as the program's all-time leader with 6,2989 all-purpose and 5,440 career rushing yards, behind only Ron Dayne and Archie Griffin in Big Ten history for rushing yards. His 40 TDs also rank 10th in FBS history.

      ANALYSIS

      Jackson provides a wealth of experience and makes the most of his athleticism by understanding his role, reacting quickly to open holes and providing versatility as a receiving option out of the backfield. Of course, with all that experience comes wear and tear, and Jackson logged 1,264 touches for the Wildcats. However, he has avoided nagging injuries to this point, starting 44 of 51 games over the past four seasons.

      Jackson is a jack-of-many trades and a master of none. He lacks elite traits, from ideal size to top-end speed to the body strength to routinely break tackles. He does anticipate well and typically makes the most of the holes opened for him. Jackson was extremely consistent in college, and his dependability should land him a spot on an NFL roster.

      20. Phillip Lindsay

      Colorado

      6-0, 193, 40 time: 4.51

      Projection: Seventh Round

      OVERVIEW

      Lindsay was born in Denver and his father, Troy, played fullback for Colorado State, so it was no surprise that Phillip Lindsay chose to stay near home to play college ball. He comes from a very athletic family, as his two sisters were also college athletes - one a volleyball player and the other a basketball player.

      Lindsay underwent knee surgery as a high school senior, receiving a get-well-soon from then-Denver Broncos running back Willis McGahee, who had undergone a similar surgery earlier in his career. Lindsay was the first player to commit to CU's 2013 recruiting class, and the back nicknamed "The Tasmanian Devil" went on to rush for 3,770 yards and 36 touchdowns in 50 games for the Buffs.

      He saved his best for last, rushing for a career-high 1,474 yards and 14 touchdowns as a senior, earning honorable mention All-Pac-12 and earning and invite to the East-West Shrine Game.

      ANALYSIS

      What Lindsay lacks in size he makes up for with versatility as a runner, receiver and special teams contributor. While undersized for the position and limited in pass pro technique, Lindsay plays with passion, quick feet and a constant urgency, hence his nickname.

      Lindsay is a highly-respected team leader (three-time captain) who coaches rave about. He lacks the ideal build for a lead back in the NFL and his heavy college workload may have rubbed some of the tread off his tires.

      But he has been a durable performer who increased his production every year, and Lindsay's locker room presence will help give him an excellent shot to stick on an NFL roster next fall.

      --Field Level Media

  • Report: Browns leaning toward Allen or Mayfield at No. 1
    By Field Level Media / Wednesday, April 25, 2018

    The Cleveland Browns are expected to pass on USC quarterback Sam Darnold with the No. 1 pick in Thursday's NFL draft, according to Mary Kay Cabot of cleveland.com.

    • The Browns have apparently "cooled" on the 20-year-old Darnold and are instead focused on either Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield or Wyoming's Josh Allen.

      Browns general manager John Dorsey hasn't tipped his hand in recent weeks, telling reporters last Thursday that he remains open to "all options" with the No. 1 and No. 4 overall picks.

      Most considered Darnold the favorite to go No. 1 for the last several weeks, but Allen's name has gained steam recently. Meanwhile, Browns head coach Hue Jackson told reporters last Tuesday that all four top quarterbacks -- Darnold, Allen, Mayfield and UCLA's Josh Rosen -- remain in play for Cleveland.

      "The only thing I really care about: Do the guys win?" Dorsey said of evaluating quarterbacks. "Does he have accuracy, does he have a strong arm? Can he throw the ball in the red zone in tight windows, can he drive the ball? At the end of the game, does he win? That's kind of what I look for."

      Mayfield, the 2017 Heisman Trophy winner, threw for 4,627 yards and 43 touchdown passes with the Sooners in his senior season. He led Oklahoma to a Big 12 title and a berth in the College Football Playoff, where it lost a double-overtime thriller to Georgia.

      Allen put himself on the NFL radar in 2016 with 3,203 passing yards and 35 total touchdowns. He returned for the 2017 season, but his top two rushers and three top receivers did not, and Allen's production and on-field play dropped.

      He finished with 1,812 passing yards and 21 total touchdowns in 2017, but missed two games due to a right shoulder injury.

      --Field Level Media

  • NFL notebook: Gronkowski definitely playing this fall
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski is committed to playing the 2018 NFL season, he announced Tuesday on social media.

    • The decision ends speculation that Gronkowski, 28, could retire.

      "I met with coach today and informed him I will be back for the 2018 season with the Pats," Gronkowski wrote on Instagram. "I have been working out, staying in shape and feel great. Looking forward to another championship run."

      Gronkowski, who hasn't played a full season since 2011, caught 69 passes for 1,084 yards and eight touchdowns last fall to earn All-Pro honors. He added 16 catches and three touchdowns in three postseason games.

      --New York Giants head coach Pat Shurmur maintains that wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. will be part of the team next season.

      Shurmur said during his pre-draft press conference that Beckham "absolutely" will be with the Giants in 2018. Reports last month had New York shopping the talented wide receiver in trade talks, with owner John Mara not ruling out the possibility of a trade entirely.

      "We constantly communicate, we had a great conversation yesterday," Shurmur said of Beckham. "He came in and we sat down as we were getting ready for this minicamp so we could talk about what we were trying to get accomplished. We've spoken on the phone, we text, it's just like any relationship. We're very honest and open with one another and we communicate frequently."

      --The Giants are engaged in trade talks centered around offensive tackle Ereck Flowers and are expected to trade the former first-rounder for draft compensation, according to NFL Network.

      Flowers was the only player on the Giants' roster who did not attend the beginning of offseason activities April 9. The ninth overall pick in 2015, Flowers is expected to move to right tackle if he stays with New York after the team signed free-agent left tackle Nate Solder to a record-setting deal in the offseason.

      Flowers, who turns 25 on Wednesday, has started all but two games at left tackle through three NFL seasons, but he has struggled, giving up 17.5 sacks and taking 23 penalties.

      --Antonio Callaway saw his shaky draft stock take another hit Tuesday when his agent confirmed that the former Florida wide receiver failed a drug test at the NFL Scouting Combine.

      According to Callaway's new agent, Malki Kawa, Callaway submitted a diluted drug test in Indianapolis. The NFL treats diluted tests the same as those found to include the presence of banned drugs.

      Callaway, who is 5-foot-10 5/8 and 200 pounds, declared for the draft after a junior year in which he didn't play at all due to a team-issued suspension related to his involvement in an alleged credit-card fraud scheme.

      --Dez Bryant is done in Dallas, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said while ruling out any chance of re-signing the Pro Bowl wide receiver, who became a free agent after the team cut him on April 13.

      "We need to move on knowing that we don't have Dez," Jones said in a news conference two days before the beginning of the NFL draft.

      Cutting Bryant saves the Cowboys $8.5 million against the salary cap. In 2015, Bryant signed a contract extension worth $70 million, and he was due to make $12.5 million this season.

      --The Cleveland Browns will not rule out taking Oklahoma quarterback Baker Mayfield with the No. 1 pick in Thursday's NFL draft, according to a report from ESPN's Adam Schefter.

      The report states the Browns might have already made up their mind on who they are taking first overall, and, if that's the case, Mayfield was at least in the conversation. Browns general manager John Dorsey hasn't tipped his hand regarding possibilities for the No. 1 and No. 4 overall picks.

      Most have considered USC quarterback Sam Darnold the favorite to go No. 1 for the last several weeks, but Wyoming quarterback Josh Allen's name has gained steam recently. Meanwhile, Browns head coach Hue Jackson told reporters last Tuesday that all four top quarterbacks -- Darnold, Allen, Mayfield and UCLA's Josh Rosen -- remain in play for Cleveland.

      --Andrew Luck attended opening day for Indianapolis Colts' voluntary minicamp but the quarterback won't throw this week as he continues to rehab his right shoulder.

      Colts general manager Chris Ballard told reporters last week that Luck has yet to throw regulation footballs. However, he noted the team remains confident its franchise quarterback will make a full recovery.

      Luck, 28, hasn't played in a game since New Year's Day of 2017. After his initial surgery in January 2017, Luck suffered a setback two weeks after returning to practice in October and has since taken more gradual steps in preparing to return.

      --The Tennessee Titans officially picked up the fifth-year option of quarterback Marcus Mariota's contract, according to published reports. General manager Jon Robinson indicated last Wednesday that the club would be exercising the option.

      The transaction gives Mariota just over $20.9 million in salary in 2019. He is slated to make $3.73 million this season.

      Mariota guided Tennessee to its first playoff victory since the 2003 campaign last season despite an uneven year in which he passed for 3,232 yards and 13 touchdowns against a career-worst 15 interceptions.

      --The Los Angeles Rams exercised the fifth-year options on the contracts of running back Todd Gurley and cornerback Marcus Peters. Gurley will receive a 2019 salary of $9.63 million, while Peters will earn $9.07 million in 2019.

      Gurley, 23, was NFL Offensive Player of the Year last season when he rushed for 1,305 yards, accumulated 788 receiving yards and had 19 combined touchdowns. He has rushed for 3,296 yards and 29 touchdowns in his three NFL seasons. He also has 128 receptions for 1,303 yards and six scores.

      Peters was obtained in an offseason deal with the Kansas City Chiefs. He has 19 interceptions over his first three NFL seasons. The 25-year-old made five interceptions in 2017 -- the lowest output of his career.

      --The Miami Dolphins have exercised the fifth-year option on wide receiver DeVante Parker.

      Parker has played in 42 games with 24 starts over three seasons and totaled 139 receptions for 1,908 yards and eight touchdowns. He set career highs with 12 starts and 57 receptions in 2017.

      The Dolphins will be without their leading receiver from last season, having traded Jarvis Landry to the Cleveland Browns this offseason.

      --Dalvon Cook, the rookie who rushed for 354 yards prior to being injured in Week 4 last season, participated in the Minnesota Vikings' strength and conditioning drills.

      He said he is pushing ahead as much as possible six-plus months after having reconstructive knee surgery.

      "You've got to trust yourself and know that you did everything in your power to get your knee back to where it's at," Cook told reporters. "I attacked this thing every day, and I did what I needed to do to get to this point, so I had no doubt when I first touched the field that it was where I wanted to be at."

      --Field Level Media

  • Ex-Florida WR Callaway failed combine drug test
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    Antonio Callaway saw his shaky draft stock take another hit Tuesday when his agent confirmed that the former Florida wide receiver failed a drug test at the NFL Scouting Combine.

    • According to Callaway's new agent, Malki Kawa, Callaway submitted a diluted drug test in Indianapolis. The NFL treats diluted tests the same as those found to include the presence of banned drugs.

      Kawa was hired by Callaway after the receiver fired Melvin Bratton following the combine.

      According to NFL Network's Ian Rapoport, Callaway maintains that the diluted test was due to over-hydrating, and he will address the issue with NFL teams.

      Callaway, who is 5-foot-10 5/8 and 200 pounds, declared for the draft after a junior year in which he didn't play at all due to a team-issued suspension related to his involvement in an alleged credit-card fraud scheme.

      His string of off-field issues includes a sexual-assault allegation after his freshman year. He was cleared of charges after he said he was "so stoned" on the date in question that he did not want to have sex.

      He also received a misdemeanor marijuana citation in May 2017, and he admitted to NFL teams that he smoked marijuana about six weeks before the combine, according to the NFL Network.

      As a true freshman with the Gators, Callaway caught 35 passes for 678 yards and four touchdowns. He also averaged 15.0 yards per punt return, producing two TDs. He added 54 receptions for 721 yards and three TDs as a sophomore, when he also scored on a rush and on an onside-kick return.

      His 4.41-second 40-yard dash (tied for third among wideouts at the combine) is a part of his electric skill, but many NFL teams reportedly are shying away from him due to his off-field problems.

      Field Level Media projected him as a third- to fourth-round draft pick, the 12th-best available wide receiver, prior to the news of the failed drug test.

      --Field Level Media

  • Jerry Jones: No chance Dez Bryant returns to Cowboys
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    Dez Bryant is done in Dallas, Cowboys owner Jerry Jones said Tuesday, ruling out any chance of the team re-signing the Pro Bowl wide receiver, who became a free agent after the team cut him on April 13.

    • "We need to move on knowing that we don't have Dez," Jones said in a news conference two days before the beginning of the NFL draft.

      The Cowboys' split with Bryant came as little surprise, as he clashed with the front office and some people on head coach Jason Garrett's staff, the Dallas Morning News noted.

      Cutting Bryant saves the team $8.5 million against the salary cap. In 2015, Bryant signed a contract extension worth $70 million, and he was due to make $12.5 million this season.

      NFL Network's Ian Rapoport said the delayed decision to cut Bryant, instead of soon after the NFL season, came because took "it took a while to get Jerry Jones on board."

      Jones is sentimental about "his guys," Rapoport said, adding that "a lot of people inside the building wanted to do this earlier."

      Bryant played in all 16 games last season, but he appeared to lack chemistry with second-year quarterback Dak Prescott.

      Bryant's average yards per reception was a career-worst 12.1, and his 69 receptions were well below his peak years of 92, 93 and 88 from 2012 to 2014.

      --Field Level Media

  • Gronkowski confirms he'll play upcoming season
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    New England Patriots tight end Rob Gronkowski is committed to playing the 2018 NFL season, he announced Tuesday on social media.

    • The announcement ends speculation that Gronkowski, 28, could retire.

      "I met with coach today and informed him I will be back for the 2018 season with the Pats," Gronkowski wrote on Instagram. "I have been working out, staying in shape and feel great. Looking forward to another championship run."

      Gronkowski, who hasn't played a full season since 2011, caught 69 passes for 1,084 yards and eight touchdowns last fall to earn All-Pro honors. He added 16 catches and three touchdowns in three postseason games.

      Gronkowski, who has undergone three back surgeries as well as procedures on his knee and forearm, was absent for the start of New England's offseason program last week amid speculation he was unhappy with the Patriots organization over training and recuperation programs.

      The Patriots' 2010 second-round draft out of the University of Arizona, Gronkowski is a five-time Pro Bowl performer and a four-time All-Pro. In 102 career games, he has 474 receptions for 7,479 yards and 76 touchdowns. Last season marked the fourth time he topped 1,000 receiving yards.

      --Field Level Media

  • Cheerleader settlement would cost NFL $1, meeting with Goodell
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    A proposed settlement between two cheerleaders and the NFL would cost the league just $1, but the lawyer for the two women also wants a "good faith" meeting with commissioner Roger Goodell in the arrangement.

    • Sara Blackwell represents Bailey Davis, a former New Orleans Saints cheerleader, and Kristan Ware, formerly of the Miami Dolphins' cheerleading squad, who both recently filed gender-discrimination complaints against the NFL.

      Blackwell's proposal wants the meeting to include at least four cheerleaders, with the goal of preparing "a set of binding rules and regulations which apply to all NFL teams," The New York Times reported.

      The cheerleaders also want a provision that would keep teams that have cheerleader squads from disbanding them as a way to retaliate against members who raise workplace complaints. That provision would remain in effect for five years.

      Blackwell told the Times that the women are not asking the league "to admit fault, or to admit guilt, or even admit that there is anything wrong. But if they do want and expect that cheerleaders should have a fair working environment, as they have stated, then it doesn't make any common sense why the answer would be no."

      The reference to the league's stance is in response to grievances previously raised by cheerleaders, in which the NFL said, in part, "Everyone who works in the NFL, including cheerleaders, has the right to work in a positive and respectful environment that is free from any and all forms of harassment and discrimination and fully complies with state and federal laws."

      Cheerleaders have complained of harassment by fans, saying the teams knew of it but did not address; of extremely low pay and long hours; and of strict rules covering everything from weight and appearance to social-media use, when those rules do not apply to players or anyone else connected with the team, the Times reported.

      Blackwell wants a response from the league by May 4.

      --Field Level Media

  • Vikings RB Cook making progress from knee surgery
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    Dalvin Cook's rehab from an ACL tear is going pretty well.

    • So good that Minnesota Vikings trainer Eric Sugarman terms it this way: "Dalvin's knocked the rehab out of the park."

      Cook's rookie campaign was off to a superb start before it was cut short after four games due to the injury to his left knee. Now the focus is making sure the standout running back is full-go when the 2018 season begins.

      Cook, who rushed for 354 yards prior to the injury, participated in strength and conditioning drills on Tuesday.

      He said he is pushing ahead as much as possible six-plus months after having reconstructive knee surgery.

      "You've got to trust yourself and know that you did everything in your power to get your knee back to where it's at," Cook told reporters. "I attacked this thing every day, and I did what I needed to do to get to this point, so I had no doubt when I first touched the field that it was where I wanted to be at."

      Sugarman has been impressed with the way the former Florida State star has approached the rehab.

      "He's done a great job," Sugarman told reporters. "He's been here every day since the injury occurred, post-surgery."

      Looming ahead is the day when Cook gets cleared for contact, and eventually there will be the test of opposing players delivering hits.

      But for now, the conditioning and strength drills are Cook's way to judge progress.

      "This is kind of the fun part again for him to get back on the field to feel like a football player again," Sugarman said.

      --Field Level Media

  • Dolphins pick up option on WR Parker
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    The Miami Dolphins have exercised the fifth-year option on wide receiver DeVante Parker, the team announced Tuesday.

    • Parker, a first-round pick (14th overall) in 2015, is signed through the 2019 season.

      Parker has played in 42 games with 24 starts over three seasons and totaled 139 receptions for 1,908 yards and eight touchdowns. He set career highs with 12 starts and 57 receptions in 2017.

      The option, which is guaranteed against injury only, comes with a projected salary of $9.4 million.

      The Dolphins will be without their leading receiver from last season, having traded Jarvis Landry to the Cleveland Browns this offseason.

      --Field Level Media

  • Free-agent DT Schwenke dies at 25
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    NFL free agent defensive tackle Kona Schwenke died Sunday at home in Laie, Hawaii. He was 25.

    • Schwenke played college football at Notre Dame and the school confirmed his passing on Monday.

      The cause of death isn't immediately known.

      Schwenke never appeared in a regular-season NFL game but was on the rosters or practice squads of five teams: Kansas City Chiefs, New England Patriots, New York Jets, Oakland Raiders and Seattle Seahawks.

      Schwenke recently participated in the Spring League and forced quarterback Johnny Manziel to fumble on April 8.

      Schwenke wasn't selected in the 2014 NFL Draft after playing 31 games for Notre Dame. He had 23 tackles as a senior in 2013.

      He was a member of the 2012 Fighting Irish squad that lost to Alabama in the national championship game.

      --Field Level Media

  • Bears GM: Medical staff influenced Meredith decision
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    What Chicago Bears general manager Ryan Pace heard from the team's physicians and training staff influenced his decision to not match the offer sheet wide receiver Cameron Meredith received from the New Orleans Saints.

    • Meredith missed all of 2017 after suffering a torn anterior cruciate ligament and slightly torn medial collateral ligament in his left knee during a preseason game last August. The 25-year-old led the Bears with 66 catches, 888 receiving yards and tied for the team lead in receiving touchdowns (four) in 2016.

      "Without getting into specifics, obviously he was coming off an injury," Pace told reporters at his pre-draft press conference Tuesday. "We lean on our training staff and our docs. Hey, I got a lot of respect for Cam and a lot of respect for the organization he went to. We wish him luck."

      The Saints signed Meredith to a two-year, $10 million offer sheet with more than $5 million guaranteed last Friday. Because Chicago gave Meredith an original-round tender -- and because Meredith entered the league as an undrafted free agent -- the Bears will receive no compensation for his departure.

      "Every organization's different," Pace said. "Every organization comes to different assessments (when it comes to medicals)."

      The Bears expect to target wide receivers at some point in this week's draft.

      "(Head coach Matt Nagy) has looked at almost every receiver in the draft," Pace said. "So he has a good feel for, 'Hey, here's how this guy fits,' and hearing that from the head coach, from the play-caller is valuable for me."

      --Field Level Media

  • Rams pick up fifth-year options of RB Gurley, CB Peters
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    The Los Angeles Rams announced Tuesday that they have exercised the fifth-year options on the contracts of running back Todd Gurley and cornerback Marcus Peters.

    • The transaction means that Gurley will receive a 2019 salary of $9.63 million, while Peters will earn $9.07 million in 2019.

      Gurley is slated to make $2.32 million this season, while Peters will receive $1.74 million.

      Gurley, 23, was NFL Offensive Player of the Year last season when he rushed for 1,305 yards, accumulated 788 receiving yards and had 19 combined touchdowns.

      He has rushed for 3,296 yards and 29 touchdowns in his three NFL seasons. He also has 128 receptions for 1,303 yards and six scores.

      Peters was obtained in an offseason deal with the Kansas City Chiefs. He has 19 interceptions over his first three NFL seasons.

      The 25-year-old had five interceptions in 2017 -- the lowest output of his career. He tied for the NFL lead with eight as a rookie in 2015 and nabbed six the following season.

      Peters also has five forced fumbles and five fumble recoveries during his career.

      The Rams still hope to re-sign star defensive tackle Aaron Donald to a new contract. Donald is a free agent after the 2018 season and didn't show up for the start of the team's offseason program.

      --Field Level Media

  • Colts QB Luck won't throw at minicamp
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    Andrew Luck is in attendance at the Indianapolis Colts' voluntary minicamp that kicked off Tuesday, but the quarterback won't throw this week as he continues to rehab his right shoulder.

    • Colts general manager Chris Ballard told reporters last week that Luck has yet to throw regulation footballs. However, he noted the team remains confident its franchise quarterback will make a full recovery, as evidenced by Indianapolis moving down from No. 3 to No. 6 in the first round of Thursday's draft.

      "We traded the third pick in the draft to move back to 6," Ballard said last Friday. "I think that said we're pretty confident in where he's at."

      Luck, 28, hasn't thrown an NFL football since October and hasn't played in a game since New Year's Day of 2017, but the team is not rushing his recovery. After his initial surgery in January 2017, Luck suffered a setback two weeks after returning to practice in October and has since taken more gradual steps in preparing to return.

      Earlier this month, Luck declined to share his expected timetable, but he said he wants to begin training camp "without a governor," hoping to be practicing fully without restrictions.

      Luck said he is throwing a smaller, lighter football as he continues to build up to regulation size.

      --Field Level Media

  • 2018 NFL Draft: Top 300 prospects
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    The Top 300 prospects for the 2018 NFL Draft, per ratings by Field Level Media:

    • Ovr, Pos Rk, Player (*=underclassman), Pos, Ht., Wt., 40, Proj., School, Comment

      1, 1, Saquon Barkley*, RB, 6-0, 233, 4.40, 1, Penn State, Outstanding all-around athlete and home-run threat with great vision as runner, receiver and return man.

      2, 1, Quenton Nelson, OG, 6-5, 325, 5.23, 1, Notre Dame, Future All-Pro in Zack Martin mold at guard and enough ability, agility to be LT candidate in right system.

      3, 1, Sam Darnold*, QB, 6-3?, 221, 4.85, 1, USC, Pro-ready passer with arm strength, leadership skills. Must improve decision-making to cut down on TOs.

      4, 1, Bradley Chubb, DE, 6-4?, 269, 4.65, 1, NC State, Not sudden or dynamic but solid in every possible way with the ability to start tomorrow.

      5, 1, Tremaine Edmunds*, OLB, 6-4½, 253, 4.54, 1, Virginia Tech, Youngest player in draft is undisciplined, but elite athlete with great burst, range, fluidity. Blitzing threat.

      6, 1, Minkah Fitzpatrick*, S, 6-0?, 204, 4.46, 1, Alabama, Versatile coverage hawk works like a walk-on and fights to be most prepared player on the field.

      7, 1, Denzel Ward*, CB, 5-10?, 183, 4.32, 1, Ohio State, Most explosive CB in class has speed, quickness to lock up with any receiver inside or outside.

      8, 1, Roquan Smith*, ILB, 6-0?, 236, 4.51, 1, Georgia, Undersized but smooth, explosive athlete. Great range in run game and moves in coverage like a safety.

      9, 2, Josh Allen*, QB, 6-4?, 237, 4.75, 1, Wyoming, Elite physical tools, including feet, arm strength and touch to mask spotty mechanics. May need some time.

      10, 1, Vita Vea*, DT, 6-4, 347, 5.10, 1, Washington, Not many humans have his size/athleticism/strength combo. Splits double teams and chases to sideline.

      11, 2, Derwin James*, S, 6-1¾, 215, 4.47, 1, Florida State, More explosive than Fitzpatrick with the same "sic 'em" mentality and skills to slide around D.

      12, 2, Da'Ron Payne*, DT, 6-2½, 311, 4.95, 1, Alabama, Highly disruptive, ascending talent anchors vs. double teams. Limited pass rush on film, but flashes.

      13, 1, Calvin Ridley*, WR, 6-0½, 189, 4.43, 1, Alabama, Big-play explosiveness and runs full route tree. Stats limited by offense. Could use more strength vs. press.

      14, 3, Baker Mayfield, QB, 6-0?, 215, 4.84, 1, Oklahoma, Polarizing prospect impressed teams with football IQ, moxie. Mid-round physical talent has rare instincts.

      15, 4, Josh Rosen*, QB, 6-4, 226, 4.92, 1, UCLA, Natural passer spins ball to all levels. Bright with good instincts, but injuries, personality turn some off.

      16, 2, Marcus Davenport, DE, 6-5¾, 264, 4.58, 1, UT San Antonio, Tall with long arms and loose limbs; better overall athlete with higher pass-rush ceiling than Chubb.

      17, 2, Will Hernandez, OG, 6-2?, 327, 5.15, 1, UTEP, Strength of a powerlifter with surprisingly light feet; instantly erases pursuit with tenacious power.

      18, 2, Harold Landry, OLB, 6-2?, 252, 4.64, 1, Boston College, DE/OLB hybrid is explosive pass rusher already boasting array of moves. Suspect strength shows vs. run.

      19, 2, Josh Jackson*, CB, 6-0?, 196, 4.48, 1, Iowa, One-year starter and converted WR has sticky mitts; compared to Ronde Barber. Sudden enough?

      20, 3, Leighton Vander Esch*, OLB, 6-4¼, 256, 4.66, 1, Boise State, Played 8-man football in HS and walked on. Tough vs. run, even better in coverage with high football IQ.

      21, 2, Derrius Guice*, RB, 5-10½, 224, 4.49, 1, LSU, Self-described ball of knives could be second coming of Marshawn Lynch with even better feet.

      22, 1, James Daniels*, C, 6-3?, 306, N/A, 1, Iowa, Explosive first step with good body control, punch and mobility. Only 20; missed 3 games to knee issues.

      23, 3, Taven Bryan*, DT, 6-5, 291, 4.98, 1, Florida, Impressive athlete who surges and explodes through gaps. Still developing and must improve mechanics.

      24, 4, Rashaan Evans, OLB, 6-1?, 232, N/A, 1, Alabama, One-year starter sports good size, build and burst. Speed questions unanswered by skipping 40 twice.

      25, 5, Lamar Jackson*, QB, 6-2¼, 216, 4.42, 1, Louisville, Ridiculous stats and draft's most electric QB is explosive athlete who lacks accuracy due to shaky mechanics.

      26, 3, Jaire Alexander*, CB, 5-10¼, 196, 4.38, 1, Louisville, Speedy (4.38 40) punt return ace with playmaking tendencies. Carries size, durability questions.

      27, 3, Isaiah Wynn, OG, 6-2?, 313, 5.06, 1, Georgia, Started 15 games at left tackle in 2017, best suited (height, reach) inside as ready-made LG starter.

      28, 4, Mike Hughes*, CB, 5-10?, 189, 4.53, 1-2, UCF, Gifted with top competitive grade, exceptional speed and elite swagger. Technique needs ironing out.

      29, 1, Connor Williams*, OT, 6-5?, 296, 5.05, 1-2, Texas, Former TE is natural mover who plays with more finesse than power. Missed most of '17 to sprained knee.

      30, 3, Ronnie Harrison*, S, 6-2, 207, 4.65, 1-2, Alabama, HS quarterback with top instincts looks like a LB in uniform. Ready-made in-the-box safety and enforcer.

      31, 4, Maurice Hurst, DT, 6-1¼, 292, 4.97, 1-2, Michigan, Remarkable athlete considering wide frame with explosive first step. Medicals vital (heart condition).

      32, 2, D.J. Moore*, WR, 6-0, 210, 4.42, 1-2, Maryland, Great production despite QB carousel (school-record 80 catches in '17). A bit slight, but a terror after catch.

      33, 3, Sony Michel, RB, 5-10?, 214, 4.54, 1-2, Georgia, Great burst through the hole and elusivness at second levels. Shared RB job and wasn't overworked.

      34, 2, Billy Price, C, 6-3¾, 305, 5.22, 1-2, Ohio State, Out until training camp due to partially torn pec at Combine, but mature leader with great technical traits.

      35, 1, Dallas Goedert, TE, 6-4?, 256, 4.67, 1-2, South Dakota State, Strong and athletic with the speed to split the seam and adapt to a flex/slot role in NFL.

      36, 2, Mike McGlinchey, OT, 6-7?, 309, 5.20, 1-2, Notre Dame, Cousin of Falcons QB Matt Ryan took over LT from Ronnie Stanley. Steady, polished prospect, if not elite.

      37, 4, Ronald Jones II*, RB, 5-11, 205, 4.39, 1-2, USC, Ballet feet and balance with springy explosiveness to stop and go. Upside of NFL gamebreaker.

      38, 5, Isaiah Oliver*, CB, 6-0¼, 201, 4.50, 2, Colorado, Tall and long with ideal man coverage skills and experience vs. No. 1 receiver in pass-crazed Big 12.

      39, 3, Christian Kirk*, WR, 5-10?, 201, 4.47, 2, Texas A&M, Quicker than fast and not a big vertical threat. Likely contributor from Day 1 as a slot WR and returner.

      40, 3, Sam Hubbard*, DE, 6-5?, 270, 4.97, 2, Ohio State, Smart, hard-nosed edge rusher who competes on every play. Limited burst, athleticism.

      41, 4, Justin Reid*, S, 6-0½, 207, 4.40, 2, Stanford, Little brother of NFL S Eric Reid, Justin is a tenacious prospect with the wheels and vision to start now.

      42, 5, Harrison Phillips, DT, 6-3¼, 307, 5.21, 2, Stanford, Former wrestler diagnoses quicking and has long arms, strong hands to control blocks. Scheme versatile.

      43, 4, Courtland Sutton*, WR, 6-3?, 218, 4.54, 2, SMU, Potential to be true No. 1 WR with excellent size, speed combo if he can separate with more consistency.

      44, 2, Hayden Hurst*, TE, 6-4½, 250, 4.67, 2, South Carolina, Ball skills and effort to win in traffic and get downfield. Dinged for age (25 as a rookie), limited route tree.

      45, 6, Carlton Davis*, CB, 6-1, 206, 4.53, 2, Auburn, Sturdy, RB-like build and agile enough to contribute as a No. 1 cornerback. First-team All-SEC in 2017.

      46, 3, Mike Gesicki, TE, 6-5½, 247, 4.54, 2, Penn State, All-American workout at Combine, long arms and explosive movements to thrive in one-on-ones.

      47, 5, Lorenzo Carter, OLB, 6-4?, 250, 4.50, 2, Georgia, Jaw-dropping athlete gained versatility at UGA. Needs to develop pass rush technique, strength in NFL.

      48, 4, Arden Key*, DE, 6-4?, 238, 4.89, 2, LSU, Gifted athlete and more of a hybrid edge rusher if off-field concerns don't scare away suitors.

      49, 5, D.J. Chark, WR, 6-2?, 199, 4.34, 2, LSU, Former track star tore up pre-draft workouts. Highly inconsistent, but height, speed to blow top off defenses.

      50, 5, Rasheem Green*, DE, 6-4¼, 275, 4.73, 2, USC, Scheme-versatile with growth potential, Green has plus size and athleticism put could wind up at left end.

      51, 3, Kolton Miller*, OT, 6-8?, 309, 4.95, 2, UCLA, Possesses all the tools, moving and mirroring well into 2nd level. Still takes false steps and power a concern.

      52, 4, Martinas Rankin, OT, 6-4?, 308, 5.25, 2, Mississippi State, Trained pre-draft to show versatility at all 5 OL spots, including snapping. Flexibility key with avg. quickness.

      53, 5, Tyrell Crosby, OT, 6-4?, 309, 5.23, 2, Oregon, Powerfully built and strong with mean streak vs. run. Modest agility will have most teams view him as RT.

      54, 7, Anthony Averett, CB, 5-11?, 183, 4.36, 2, Alabama, Ran 4.36 and claims he's even faster, having Nick Saban as spotter and slot experience are huge plusses.

      55, 8, Donte Jackson*, CB, 5-10½, 178, 4.32, 2, LSU, Tied for top 40 time among CBs. Competes even without prototype size, weight and length.

      56, 6, Nathan Shepherd, DT, 6-3¾, 315, 5.09, 2, Fort Hays State, Well-traveled, including 2 years out of sport. NFL starter kit for a body and dominated at Senior Bowl.

      57, 6, Mason Rudolph, QB, 6-4?, 235, 4.90, 2, Oklahoma State, 42-game starter was uber-productive in fast-paced offense. Big pocket passer with good arm lacks mobility.

      58, 5, Nick Chubb, RB, 5-10?, 227, 4.52, 2, Georgia, One-speed runner with good vision, patience. Good feet with powerful legs to be short-yardage ace.

      59, 7, Tim Settle*, DT, 6-2¾, 329, 5.37, 2, Virginia Tech, Draws comparisons to Vince Wilfork for being so nimble at his size. Bursts hard, developing instincts.

      60, 6, Brian O'Neill*, OT, 6-6?, 297, 4.82, 2-3, Pittsburgh, Former TE has intriguing tools for teams featuring outside zone, sweeps, screens. Struggles against power.

      61, 4, Mark Andrews*, TE, 6-5?, 256, 4.58, 2-3, Oklahoma, Extra wideout for Sooners with 15 career red-zone receptions. Size potential to be a blocker.

      62, 6, Anthony Miller, WR, 5-11?, 201, 4.49, 2-3, Memphis, 3-level threat with speed, ball skills and elusiveness. Medical key after Jones fracture in bowl game.

      63, 6, Kerryon Johnson*, RB, 5-11½, 213, 4.56, 2-3, Auburn, Versatile weapon. Natural runner with return game experience and polish as a receiver.

      64, 5, Jessie Bates III*, S, 6-1?, 200, 4.50, 2-3, Wake Forest, Corner or safety, Bates is a fluid mover with short-area quickness to be utiltity defensive back.

      65, 7, Dante Pettis, WR, 6-0½, 186, N/A, 2-3, Washington, Athletic bloodlines, set NCAA record with 9 punt return TDs. Very elusive, some questions about 40 time.

      66, 6, Uchenna Nwosu, OLB, 6-2?, 251, 4.65, 2-3, USC, Former safety recruit blossomed in '17. 'Tweener with quick 1st step and good awareness; liability vs. run.

      67, 7, Rashaad Penny, RB, 5-11, 220, 4.46, 2-3, San Diego State, Durable (54 G) and hyper-productive, capable of big plays and contributions as runner-receiver-returner.

      68, 3, Frank Ragnow, C, 6-5?, 312, 5.18, 2-3, Arkansas, Charged with 0 sacks over past three seasons in SEC. Intense competitor with traits to step in as a starter.

      69, 4, Austin Corbett, OG, 6-4?, 306, 5.15, 2-3, Nevada, College OT needs to slide inside and showed promise in OG workouts. Pro makeup and locker room leader.

      70, 8, James Washington, WR, 5-11, 213, 4.54, 3, Oklahoma State, Biletnikoff winner with 74-1,549-13 as senior. Big play waiting to happen. Limited route tree in college.

      71, 9, Deon Cain*, WR, 6-1?, 202, 4.43, 3, Clemson, Good blend of size, speed athleticism with big-play moves. Stats haven't yet matched explosive upside.

      72, 10, Equanimeous St. Brown*, WR, 6-4¾, 214, 4.48, 3, Notre Dame, Dangerous deep threat who lines up all over field. Gifted; needs to stay on more routes, win contested balls.

      73, 8, Derrick Nnadi, DT, 6-1, 317, 5.38, 3, Florida State, Bit undersized but sports ideal build. Animal in weight room. Should excel eating blocks vs. run.

      74, 9, B.J. Hill, DT, 6-3¼, 311, 4.99, 3, NC State, Solid run defender can shed blocks and make plays in the hole. Limited length and pass rush potential.

      75, 9, M.J. Stewart, CB, 5-10?, 200, 4.54, 3, North Carolina, Broke up 41 passes and embraces being challenged in coverage, but limited by average speed.

      76, 7, Jerome Baker*, OLB, 6-1?, 229, 4.53, 3, Ohio State, Undersized "Will" with tremendous athleticism and range in run game. Only 21, needs time to develop.

      77, 6, Da'Shawn Hand, DE, 6-3?, 297, 4.83, 3, Alabama, Big and powerful with some DT traits, Hand can set the edge and is nearly immovable vs. the run.

      78, 5, Braden Smith, OG, 6-6¼, 315, 5.20, 3, Auburn, Bullying upper-body strength and plays with the alley-fighter's mentality OL coaches covet.

      79, 8, Obo Okoronkwo, OLB, 6-1?, 253, 4.77, 3, Oklahoma, "Obo" threatens edge with great burst, balance. Liability in run game, projecting as sub-package rusher.

      80, 7, Jalyn Holmes, DE, 6-4?, 283, 4.82, 3, Ohio State, Strength, size and bull rush must be respected. Drives through blocks to stuff run and could fit at DT.

      81, 5, Ian Thomas, TE, 6-3?, 259, 4.65, 3, Indiana, Smooth mover with quick-twitch movements could take off with NFL coaching and stabliity.

      82, 7, Chukwuma Okorafor, OT, 6-6, 320, 5.31, 3, Western Michigan, Moved to U.S. as teen. Excellent size, movement skills, but needs work on technique, physical attitude.

      83, 10, Duke Dawson, CB, 5-10?, 197, 4.46, 3, Florida, Hybrid defender started three positions at UF and could do same in NFL: thick but smooth in reverse.

      84, 8, Jamarco Jones, OT, 6-4, 299, 5.50, 3, Ohio State, Steadily improved despite lacking great athleticism or power. Reliable - if unspectacular - potential starter.

      85, 8, Duke Ejiofor, DE, 6-3?, 267, 4.84, 3, Wake Forest, Hurt too often to be considered in top 64 but productive - 17 sacks past two seasons - when healthy.

      86, 9, Kemoko Turay, DE, 6-4?, 253, 4.65, 3, Rutgers, Great explosion off the snap, closing on running backs and quarterbacks with intent. Shoulder issues.

      87, 9, Malik Jefferson*, OLB, 6-2¼, 236, 4.52, 3, Texas, Dynamic athlete with high ceiling, low floor. Dangerous blitzer, but poor awareness and inconsisent tackler.

      88, 11, DaeSean Hamilton, WR, 6-0?, 203, 4.47, 3, Penn State, PSU's all-time leader with 214 catches is crafty route-runner who moves chains and is great in locker room.

      89, 6, Kyzir White, S, 6-1?, 218, 4.69, 3, West Virginia, Best near line of scrimmage with special teams value, but no clear NFL fit despite high-intensity style.

      90, 1, Michael Dickson*, P, 6-3, 205, N/A, 3, Texas, School-record 226 punts and 45.3-yard avg. Ray Guy winner has booming leg with directional accuracy.

      91, 7, Marcus Allen, S, 6-2?, 215, 4.63, 3, Penn State, Versatile playmaker and team leader who delivered big hits but can be caught on his heels in coverage.

      92, 10, Tyquan Lewis, DE, 6-3¼, 269, 4.71, 3, Ohio State, Better suited to beat guards with interior rush but could wind up on the edge with plus competitiveness.

      93, 9, Geron Christian*, OT, 6-5?, 298, 5.33, 3, Louisville, Raw but possesses excellent tools to develop. Great length and hoops background is evident in athletic feet.

      94, 10, Deadrin Senat, DT, 6-0, 314, 5.16, 3, South Florida, Thick, squatty build to maintain leverage and anchor vs. double teams. Clogger doesn't threaten as rusher.

      95, 11, RJ McIntosh*, DT, 6-4½, 286, N/A, 3, Miami, Great effort on, off field, but game needs polish. Significant interior pass rush upside to develop.

      96, 8, Royce Freeman, RB, 5-11½, 229, 4.54, 3-4, Oregon, Runs in third gear. Elite leg drive, power to rip through tackles and push the pile at the goal line.

      97, 2, Josey Jewell, ILB, 6-1, 234, 4.82, 3-4, Iowa, Tackling machine (437 for career) isn't an elite athlete, but natural instincts, passion to contribute early.

      98, 10, Jeff Holland*, OLB, 6-1?, 249, 4.79, 3-4, Auburn, Blossomed in lone year as starter with 10 sacks, 13 TFL. Projects as 3-4 OLB, sub-package rusher early on.

      99, 11, Isaac Yiadom, CB, 6-0?, 190, 4.52, 3-4, Boston College, Three-year starter at BC in NFL-type defensive schemes. Hustle and effort are certain, size/speed aren't.

      100, 10, Orlando Brown*, OT, 6-7?, 345, 5.85, 3-4, Oklahoma, Son of late "Zeus" started 40 games at LT, but stock was hammered by historically poor Combine workout.

      101, 3, Micah Kiser, ILB, 6-0?, 238, 4.66, 3-4, Virginia, Great instincts, eyes and discipline in run game. Good blitzer and scheme-versatile. Liability in coverage.

      102, 12, Antonio Callaway*, WR, 5-10?, 200, 4.41, 3-4, Florida, Electric on the field, major red flags off it. Major wild card declared early after being suspended all of '17.

      103, 12, Kevin Toliver*, CB, 6-2, 192, 4.52, 3-4, LSU, Plays with leverage and has top size and length. Could be a steal if he takes to NFL discipline, coaching.

      104, 13, Tarvarus McFadden*, CB, 6-2¼, 204, 4.68, 3-4, Florida State, Slow for a corner (4.68), makes up for shortcomings with long arms; likely only fits zone scheme.

      105, 7, Mike White, QB, 6-4?, 224, 5.09, 3-4, Western Kentucky, Has excellent size, arm, and willing to hang in pocket. Highly inconsistent passer but natural skills to mold.

      106, 8, Terrell Edmunds*, S, 6-0½, 217, 4.47, 4, Virginia Tech, Trustworthy and strong in run support, limited potential as a centerfielder in man defense.

      107, 4, Mason Cole, C, 6-4?, 305, 5.23, 4, Michigan, Started program-record 51 games. Lacks length or size for NFL OT, but has frame, agility to succeed inside.

      108, 13, Michael Gallup, WR, 6-0¾, 205, 4.51, 4, Colorado State, Lines up all over formation with good - not great - size, athleticism. Potential No. 2 could contribute early.

      109, 12, Trenton Thompson*, DT, 6-2?, 288, 5.06, 4, Georgia, Combines above-average tools with great motor. Stays low, plays hard but production limited by injuries.

      110, 9, Nyheim Hines*, RB, 5-8?, 198, 4.38, 4, NC State, Swiss Army role for Wolfpack; ideal third-down back entering league with potential to be much more.

      111, 11, Josh Sweat*, DE, 6-4¾, 251, 4.53, 4, Florida State, History of knee injuries. Fast, lean and explosive, changing direction on a dime and closing in a blink.

      112, 14, Holton Hill*, CB, 6-1?, 196, 4.49, 4, Texas, Off-field matters spoiled UT tenure. Gifted, capable in man or zone if he silences grabby hands.

      113, 14, J'Mon Moore, WR, 6-2?, 207, 4.60, 4, Missouri, Great size, length, fluidity with explosive playmaking skills, but very raw and feasted on limited route tree.

      114, 10, Bo Scarbrough*, RB, 6-1?, 228, 4.52, 4, Alabama, Built like LB-S and runs like one, seeking contact. High-cut runner, limited wiggle and durability.

      115, 15, Rashaan Gaulden*, CB, 6-0¾, 197, 4.52, 4, Tennessee, Sprinter with first-class speed and abundant natural gifts can serve many purposes at next level.

      116, 12, Andrew Brown, DE, 6-3?, 296, 5.03, 4, Virginia, Superior run stopper with limited rush repertoire and tenacity to play anywhere on the D-line.

      117, 13, Folorunso Fatukasi, DT, 6-3¾, 318, 5.29, 4, UConn, "Foley" was disruptive despite limited stats. Powerful and scheme-versatile with improved technique.

      118, 8, Luke Falk, QB, 6-3?, 215, 4.85, 4, Washington State, Highly productive in Mike Leach offense. Accurate, but lacks arm strength and takes far too many hits.

      119, 16, Nick Nelson*, CB, 5-10?, 200, 4.52, 4, Wisconsin, Suffered torn meniscus in workout with Lions. Short yet confident, coordinated athlete with leadership.

      120, 11, Darius Leonard, OLB, 6-2, 234, 4.70, 4, South Carolina State, Good hustle, range, and stood out in games against FBS teams. Needs strength, but not much room to add.

      121, 11, John Kelly*, RB, 5-9?, 216, 4.65, 4, Tennessee, Shared team lead in catches in '17 with workhorse mentality. Short with limited speed, agility.

      122, 11, Will Richardson*, OT, 6-5?, 306, 5.26, 4, NC State, Charged with zero sacks in past 400 pass-blocking snaps. Guard-like frame difficult to move; off-field flags.

      123, 12, Mark Walton*, RB, 5-9?, 202, 4.60, 4, Miami, Season-ending injury four games into 2017. Shifty, sudden but too small to be bell-cow RB.

      124, 17, J.C. Jackson*, CB, 5-9¾, 201, 4.46, 4, Maryland, On the red list for character; talented enough. Made most of second chance at Maryland past two seasons.

      125, 15, Keke Coutee*, WR, 5-9¾, 181, 4.43, 4, Texas Tech, Dynamic in space with terrific speed, quickness. Great slot potential and vertical upside with added strength.

      126, 16, Tre'Quan Smith*, WR, 6-2, 210, 4.49, 4, UCF, Above-the-rim target regularly makes acrobatic grabs. Strong intangibles, but lack of elite speed may hinder.

      127, 9, Armani Watts, S, 5-10½, 202, 4.65, 4, Texas A&M, Four-year starter with special teams traits but enough speed and agility to contribute in coverage.

      128, 12, Shaquem Griffin, OLB, 6-0?, 227, 4.38, 4, UCF, Stole Combine with great workout minus amputated left hand. Can fly; skills to contribute in defined role.

      129, 13, Chad Thomas, DE, 6-5, 281, 4.92, 4, Miami, Mr. Olympia phsyique and 81 1/2-inch arms to be a mismatch-type, third rusher instantly.

      130, 18, Davontae Harris, CB, 5-11, 205, 4.43, 4, Illinois State, Tops on team in tackles and passes defended. More physical than nifty, but finds his way to ball.

      131, 19, Tony Brown, CB, 5-11?, 199, 4.35, 4, Alabama, Nickel defender with elite speed to mix and match in secondary; didn't finish enough plays.

      132, 6, Dalton Schultz, TE, 6-5?, 244, 4.74, 4, Stanford, Pro-style product viewed more as a No. 2 tight end, blocks angry and fits tradition of Stanford TE.

      133, 6, Wyatt Teller, OG, 6-4½, 301, 5.24, 4-5, Virginia Tech, Broad frame and finishes blocks while rarely winding up on the ground, but 2017 play too inconsistent.

      134, 13, Akrum Wadley, RB, 5-9?, 194, 4.54, 4-5, Iowa, Ran behind FB, also lined up in slot, returned kicks. Not used and abused as one-year starter (536 carries).

      135, 5, Scott Quessenberry, C, 6-4, 315, 5.09, 4-5, UCLA, Explodes off the snap with low center of gravity. Experience at all three interior positions increases value.

      136, 14, Breeland Speaks*, DE, 6-2?, 283, 4.87, 4-5, Ole Miss, Very raw, Speaks shows enticing flashes in between long lapses. Too talented to ignore but needs polish.

      137, 13, Fred Warner, OLB, 6-3?, 236, 4.64, 4-5, BYU, Built like a big safety and showed off athleticism at Combine. Attacks run; needs strength, better technique.

      138, 20, Parry Nickerson, CB, 5-10, 182, 4.34, 4-5, Tulane, Four-year starter's history of knee issues overshadows ball skills, but is he big enough to hold up?

      139, 9, Kyle Lauletta, QB, 6-2?, 222, 4.81, 4-5, Richmond, Senior Bowl MVP lacks rocket arm, but gets ball out quick, makes smart decisions and exploits weaknesses.

      140, 12, Desmond Harrison, OT, 6-6, 292, 4.90, 4-5, West Georgia, Value all about great physical tools. Many travels included dismissal from Texas for drug-related incidents.

      141, 7, Tony Adams, OG, 6-2, 315, 5.48, 4-5, NC State, Reliable, not elite, starter (school-record 47 at NC State) with hands and balance honed playing tennis.

      142, 17, Allen Lazard, WR, 6-5, 225, 4.55, 4-5, Iowa State, Wields big frame effectively to box out defenders. Doesn't scare DBs with speed, too often playing like a TE.

      143, 10, Godwin Igwebuike, S, 5-11?, 213, 4.44, 5, Northwestern, Looks the part, limitations in speed and pure athleticism push him down draft boards.

      144, 7, Durham Smythe, TE, 6-5?, 253, 4.81, 5, Notre Dame, Huge target with massive mitts and focused catch process. Below-average speed, athleticism.

      145, 13, Alex Cappa, OT, 6-5¾, 305, 5.39, 5, Humboldt State, Dominated lower level with technique and physicality and plays with mean streak. Disappointing Combine.

      146, 14, Hercules Mata'afa*, DT, 6-2¼, 254, 4.76, 5, Washington State, Explodes out of stance and lives in the backfield with high motor. Too small to survive inside vs. run.

      147, 15, Kylie Fitts, DE, 6-3¾, 263, 4.69, 5, Utah, Freakish workout at NFL Combine might get him over-drafted but too many injuries to overlook.

      148, 18, Cedrick Wilson, WR, 6-2, 188, 4.55, 5, Boise State, Productive WR on slants, crossers and vertical routes who needs increased strength to break more tackles.

      149, 11, Quin Blanding, S, 6-2, 207, 4.63, 5, Virginia, Holds ACC tackles record (495) for DB. No special qualities jump off film, which screams special teamer.

      150, 14, Kalen Ballage, RB, 6-1½, 228, 4.46, 5, Arizona State, Strong, sturdy, balanced. Runs through contact and offers upside in return game but fumbles are issue.

      151, 2, JK Scott, P, 6-5¼, 207, 4.83, 5, Alabama, 2x Ray Guy finalist allowed only four returns in '17. Powerful leg with hang time; can handle kickoff duties.

      152, 12, Jordan Whitehead*, S, 5-10?, 198, 4.60, 5, Pittsburgh, Used to counter mismatches at Pitt. Encountered off-field issues. Unique, swift athlete.

      153, 19, Simmie Cobbs*, WR, 6-3?, 220, 4.64, 5, Indiana, Plays to timed speed, but shows extra gear vertically and bull for CBs to deal with height, width, length.

      154, 20, Deontay Burnett*, WR, 5-11?, 186, 4.53, 5, USC, Sam Darnold's fave target led Pac-12 with 86 catches in '17. Limited to slot and small hands a concern.

      155, 21, Marcell Ateman, WR, 6-4½, 216, 4.62, 5, Oklahoma State, Size, ball skills to intrigue teams. Needs to develop route-running, but could be red-zone threat early on.

      156, 16, Dorance Armstrong Jr.*, DE, 6-3?, 257, 4.87, 5, Kansas, A fit for wide-9 rush technique or candidate for OLB conversion as a rush specialist.

      157, 14, Joe Noteboom, OT, 6-5, 309, 4.96, 5, TCU, Good size, length and quickness to handle speed rushes. Also highly inconsistent with sloppy technique.

      158, 4, Genard Avery, ILB, 6-0, 248, 4.59, 5, Memphis, HS powerlifter opened eyes with combine testing. Not fluid, but plays physically inside, outside or on edge.

      159, 15, Brandon Parker, OT, 6-7?, 305, 5.40, 5, North Carolina A&T, Started all 48 career games at LT, allowing no sacks. NFL tools to develop with additional strength.

      160, 22, Jordan Lasley*, WR, 6-1, 203, 4.50, 5, UCLA, Explosive athlete who is faster on film than at Combine. Several issues off-field and too many drops on it.

      161, 1, Jaylen Samuels, FB, 5-11½, 225, 4.54, 5, NC State, True 'tweener with TE and RB skills might ultimately be best in West Coast offense at fullback.

      162, 8, Chris Herndon, TE, 6-3¾, 253, 4.78, 5, Miami, Thick and athletic with directional mobility to become a top route runner and receiving tight end.

      163, 9, Troy Fumagalli, TE, 6-4¾, 247, 4.88, 5, Wisconsin, Excellent natural hands. Still works like a walk-on. No evidence he can become a playmaker.

      164, 8, Sean Welsh, OG, 6-3, 300, 5.33, 5, Iowa, RG-RT skill set and background in a program known for churning out NFL OL, but limited athletically.

      165, 10, Tyler Conklin, TE, 6-3, 254, 4.80, 5, Central Michigan, Smooth stride and sweet hops but slightly shorter than NFL prototype and untested vs. top competition.

      166, 16, Timon Parris, OT, 6-6, 320, N/A, 5, Stony Brook, Raw and powerful, seeking to become 1st Stony Brook OL drafted. Recovering from broken leg (October).

      167, 21, Taron Johnson, CB, 5-11?, 192, 4.50, 5, Weber State, On the small side - issue vs. run - with a maxed-out frame and untested against elite wide receivers.

      168, 5, Tegray Scales, ILB, 6-0?, 230, 4.77, 5, Indiana, Sniffs out plays quickly and plays faster than timed speed. Below average size; struggles taking on blocks.

      169, 15, Kendrick Norton*, DT, 6-2, 312, 5.25, 5, Miami, Ken Jr.'s son sports ideal size, length, motor to clog run lanes. OK athlete is likely two-down run stuffer.

      170, 22, Quenton Meeks*, CB, 6-1, 209, 4.55, 5-6, Stanford, Lacks pure speed and suddenness to be a starter. Enough attitude and size to make the roster.

      171, 16, Justin Jones, DT, 6-2½, 309, 5.09, 5-6, NC State, Strong for his size, playing low and delivering power. Improved stock with strong week at Senior Bowl.

      172, 23, Auden Tate*, WR, 6-4?, 228, 4.68, 5-6, Florida State, Size is biggest asset, especially in traffic - which is usually heavy due to lack of elite speed and athleticism.

      173, 13, Dane Cruikshank, S, 6-1, 209, 4.41, 5-6, Arizona, Great burst and speed with clear football instincts and played his best in primetime moments.

      174, 14, DeShon Elliott*, S, 6-0?, 210, 4.58, 5-6, Texas, Single-speed safety with no extra gear to chase long, can cover deficiencies with heady play.

      175, 17, Marquis Haynes, DE, 6-2?, 235, 4.67, 5-6, Ole Miss, Posted 32.0 career sacks but offers little beyond burst due to size, reach and leverage shortcomings.

      176, 17, Toby Weathersby*, OT, 6-4?, 317, 5.34, 5-6, LSU, Started solely on right side. Struggles with speed, maintaining blocks. Could have used another year at LSU.

      177, 23, Darius Phillips, CB, 5-9?, 193, 4.54, 5-6, Western Michigan, Undersized extra corner in the NFL will need to scrap to win has the gifts and guts to get it done.

      178, 14, Leon Jacobs, OLB, 6-1?, 246, 4.48, 5-6, Wisconsin, Raw athlete with relentless motor lacks technical pass rush skills. 'Tweener could prove diamond in rough.

      179, 11, Will Dissly, TE, 6-4, 267, 4.87, 5-6, Washington, Converted defensive end still learning to block and run refined routes; size warrants a shot.

      180, 1, Daniel Carlson, K, 6-5, 213, N/A, 6, Auburn, 3x Lou Groza finalist has soccer background and booming leg. Tested in big games but not much weather.

      181, 2, Dimitri Flowers, FB, 6-1?, 248, 4.83, 6, Oklahoma, Son of 2000 first-rounder Erik Flowers. Physical and savvy blocker can do some damage as receiver.

      182, 24, D.J. Reed*, CB, 6-0, 188, 4.51, 6, Kansas State, Not big but tough and determined. Ace return man had KO and punt returns for TDs at Kansas State.

      183, 18, Kentavius Street, DE, 6-2¼, 280, 4.87, 6, NC State, Strong-side end with the size and power to develop into a rotational end or low-upside starter.

      184, 19, Ade Aruna, DE, 6-4?, 262, 4.61, 6, Tulane, Toolsy prospect with great lower-half explosion, first step, long speed. Raw, needs NFL redshirt.

      185, 15, Siran Neal, S, 6-0, 206, 4.56, 6, Jacksonville State, NFL body type, low-level college resume. Advanced football mind with versatile traits, experience.

      186, 9, Skyler Phillips, OG, 6-2½, 314, 5.09, 6, Idaho State, Requisite strength and stone hands to play inside but stiff on the hoof and ineffective blocking LBs.

      187, 6, Jack Cichy, ILB, 6-2?, 238, 4.55, 6, Wisconsin, Former walk-on always in right place at right time. Long injury history (pec, ACL); hasn't played since '16.

      188, 15, Mike McCray, OLB, 6-1?, 243, 4.76, 6, Michigan, Animal vs. run with size, length, physicality to fend off blocks. Average speed; may fare best inside in 3-4.

      189, 18, Matt Pryor, OT, 6-7, 358, N/A, 6, TCU, Surprisingly nimble for gigantic frame with long arms (36") and big hands (11"). Too many negative plays.

      190, 24, Korey Robertson*, WR, 6-1, 212, 4.56, 6, Southern Miss, "D-Block" has so-so straight-line speed, but is quick in and out of breaks and slippery after the catch.

      191, 16, Trayvon Henderson, S, 6-0?, 204, 4.59, 6, Hawai'i, See-ball, get-ball mentality to climb NFL depth chart, unafraid of special teams path.

      192, 16, Josh Adams*, RB, 6-1?, 213, 4.52, 6, Notre Dame, Runs to and through contact. Limited in open space and upright running style equates to NFL punishment.

      193, 20, John Franklin-Myers, DE, 6-4, 283, 4.75, 6, Stephen F. Austin, NFL size but is more potential than polish with scouts sweating his limited production at SFA.

      194, 25, Michael Joseph, CB, 6-0?, 187, 4.53, 6, Dubuque, DIII POY. Self-made prospect and gifted ballhawk with playmaking tendencies, average speed.

      195, 3, Nick Bawden, FB, 6-2, 245, N/A, 6, San Diego State, Surprising attack mentality for converted QB, transformed physically and emotionally to fit position.

      196, 12, Jordan Akins, TE, 6-3, 249, 4.93, 6, UCF, Former Texas Rangers MLB farmhand has the long arms and coordination to develop as backup TE.

      197, 17, Poona Ford, DT, 5-11?, 306, 5.09, 6, Texas, Undersized and lacks dominant trait, but utilizes natural leverage, strong hands to flash rush potential.

      198, 19, Cole Madison, OT, 6-5, 313, 5.33, 6, Washington State, Former WR is quick with his hands and feet. Not a mauler with great raw strength and may move inside.

      199, 7, Azeem Victor, ILB, 6-2?, 240, 4.72, 6, Washington, Piqued as Soph. with instincts, physical presence v. run. Slowed with added weight; suspended twice in '17.

      200, 25, Daurice Fountain, WR, 6-1?, 209, 4.54, 6, Northern Iowa, Shrine Game MVP was Combine snub but freakish athleticism stood out at pro day. Very raw, needs time.

      201, 17, Darrel Williams, RB, 6-0, 225, 4.68, 6, LSU, Reliable receiver who runs with vision and brings big-play flair due to first step, make-you-miss moves.

      202, 17, Tre Flowers, S, 6-3¾, 202, 4.45, 6, Oklahoma State, Four-year starter for Cowboys, average athletic ability brings too many limitations at next level.

      203, 16, Oren Burks, OLB, 6-3?, 233, 4.59, 6, Vanderbilt, Speed and experience at safety show in coverage, but inconsistent vs. run and needs time to develop.

      204, 6, Will Clapp*, C, 6-4½, 314, 5.39, 6, LSU, Three-year starter in SEC versatile along the interior, but an average athlete who must increase strength.

      205, 26, Chris Campbell, CB, 6-0¾, 195, 4.55, 6, Penn State, Physical and knows how to win and use his body to prevent receivers from getting deep.

      206, 20, Jamil Demby, OT, 6-4?, 335, 5.58, 6, Maine, Big, muscular, powerful 2x team captain. Below average athleticism exposed vs. run could lead to OG move.

      207, 17, Dorian O'Daniel, OLB, 6-0?, 223, 4.61, 6, Clemson, Body of a big safety, reyling on speed, quickness. Lacks play strength, but could be special teams demon.

      208, 18, Bilal Nichols, DT, 6-4, 306, 4.96, 6, Delaware, Good size with room to add mass, and adds versatility down the line to compensate for raw technique.

      209, 10, Kurt Benkert, QB, 6-2?, 218, 4.95, 6, Virginia, Tools and playmaking ability warrant a look, but highly erratic pocket movement and how he scans field.

      210, 27, Grant Haley, CB, 5-9, 190, 4.44, 6, Penn State, Undersized with short arms, he's springy in short areas and excels as a slot option and returner.

      211, 26, Trey Quinn*, WR, 5-11?, 203, 4.55, 6, SMU, Former track star also threw no-no at '08 Little League WS. Modest pre-draft workouts; slot prospect.

      212, 27, Dylan Cantrell, WR, 6-2?, 226, 4.59, 6, Texas Tech, One-trick pony who needs to make circus catches due to lack of speed. Outstanding body control.

      213, 28, Darren Carrington, WR, 6-2¼, 199, 4.78, 6, Utah, Very good downfield target finished at Utah after boot from Oregon following laundry list of off-field issues.

      214, 13, Ryan Izzo*, TE, 6-4?, 256, 4.94, 6-7, Florida State, Left school one year early. Offers only modest speed and blocking potential. Developmental prospect.

      215, 18, Chase Edmonds, RB, 5-9?, 205, 4.55, 6-7, Fordham, Compact runner with yo-yo movement to elude tackles; top three-cone, short shuttle for RBs at Combine.

      216, 10, Colby Gossett, OG, 6-4?, 315, 5.20, 6-7, Appalachian State, Started at RG and RT but limited agility and stone legs render him an NFL backup or swing reserve.

      217, 29, Marquez Valdes-Scantling, WR, 6-4, 206, 4.37, 6-7, South Florida, Track speed shows on film, getting on top of DBs in a flash. Plays smaller than size and very much a project.

      218, 18, Troy Apke, S, 6-1¼, 200, 4.34, 6-7, Penn State, Underdog with great workout numbers and good - not special - on-field results at college level.

      219, 19, Roc Thomas, RB, 5-10, 198, 4.56, 6-7, Jacksonville State, Spin doctor with impeccable body control ranked No. 2 as HS RB recruit behind Leonard Fournette.

      220, 2, Eddy Pineiro*, K, 6-0, 185, N/A, 6-7, Florida, Left Gators early as program's most accurate kicker, including better than than 90% from 40-plus.

      221, 11, Taylor Hearn*, OG, 6-4, 330, 5.45, 6-7, Clemson, Short arms limit effectivenss vs. NFL speed and length; top grades for toughness, competitiveness.

      222, 20, Justin Jackson, RB, 6-0, 193, 4.50, 6-7, Northwestern, Too small to be fulltime RB but had 122 career catches, beckoning third-down or slot role in NFL.

      223, 21, Marcell Frazier, DE, 6-4, 261, 4.66, 6-7, Missouri, Football junkie and high-effort end who does just enough to keep on the final 53 as a rookie.

      224, 28, Brandon Facyson, CB, 6-1½, 203, 4.53, 7, Virginia Tech, Advanced football instincts but mostly average testing, appears to have a special teams ceiling.

      225, 21, Phillip Lindsay, RB, 5-7, 184, 4.41, 7, Colorado, Slashing runner with no-quit mantra and track background set school record (5926) for total yards.

      226, 14, David Wells, TE, 6-6, 256, 4.75, 7, San Diego State, Mostly a blocker, Wells can catch what hits his hands but will be used as a third offensive tackle in NFL.

      227, 29, Levi Wallace, CB, 6-0¼, 179, 4.63, 7, Alabama, Smooth, fluid mover with wide receiver traits will need to bulk up to contend with pumped-up pros.

      228, 8, Nick DeLuca, ILB, 6-2?, 251, 4.85, 7, North Dakota State, Classic Mike 'backer who diagnoses plays before they develop. Old-school thumper needs right scheme.

      229, 18, Keishawn Bierria, OLB, 6-0?, 230, 4.79, 7, Washington, Terrific leader who brings intense physical edge, but exposed vs. better athletes, especially in coverage.

      230, 19, Davin Bellamy, OLB, 6-3¾, 255, N/A, 7, Georgia, Athleticism to win early and threaten QB. Lanky build lacks strength and gets bullied vs. run.

      231, 30, Javon Wims, WR, 6-2?, 215, 4.53, 7, Georgia, Well-traveled athlete emerged as UGA's leading receiver in '17. Excellent size for 50-50s; needs route work.

      232, 20, Skai Moore, OLB, 6-2¼, 226, 4.73, 7, South Carolina, Uber-productive, leading team in tackles 4x. Great instincts, but lacks size and is liability in coverage.

      233, 22, Trevon Young, DE, 6-3?, 258, 4.78, 7, Louisville, Two hip surgeries since Dec. 2015; looked like a first-round talent previous. Has 3-4 OLB skill set.

      234, 30, Avonte Maddox, CB, 5-9?, 184, 4.39, 7, Pittsburgh, Wins every footrace and was team captain; some team will jump on his playmaking ability.

      235, 23, Olasunkanmi Adeniyi*, DE, 6-1?, 248, 4.81, 7, Toledo, Pass-rush specialist who could convert to OLB in 3-4 defense. Only 20 and plays with non-stop motor.

      236, 19, P.J. Hall, DT, 6-0, 308, 4.83, 7, Sam Houston State, Combine snub grabbed attention with impressive pro day. FCS dominator could prove late-round steal.

      237, 31, D'Montre Wade, CB, 5-11?, 206, 5.20, 7, Murray State, Upside limited by heavy legs, but safety and return role could beckon based on excellent ball skills.

      238, 9, Shaun Dion Hamilton, ILB, 5-11¾, 228, 4.76, 7, Alabama, Nick Saban lauds football smarts. Quick and makes plays behind the line, but significant injury red flags.

      239, 21, Peter Kalambayi, OLB, 6-3, 252, 4.57, 7, Stanford, Better athlete than player stood out at Combine. With improved technique, could develop into starter.

      240, 31, Jaleel Scott, WR, 6-4¾, 218, 4.56, 7, New Mexico State, Great size, athleticism, and hoops background shows on contested balls. Untapped potential, but very raw.

      241, 11, Chase Litton*, QB, 6-5, 232, 4.94, 7, Marshall, Tall, with quick release and competitive nature. Lacks mobility and great accuracy, but tools to develop.

      242, 19, Damon Webb, S, 5-10¾, 209, 4.62, 7, Ohio State, Rangy and aggressive, was coach in the huddle for Bucks and was trained at cornerback.

      243, 32, Jordan Thomas, CB, 6-0?, 187, 4.64, 7, Oklahoma, Fits evolving NFL prototype with plus ball skills if pro coaches can sell him on self-confidence.

      244, 20, John Atkins, DT, 6-2?, 321, 5.38, 7, Georgia, Classic two-gapper won't stuff the stat sheet or scare many QBs, but could thrive as rotational space-eater.

      245, 7, Brian Allen, C, 6-1, 300, 5.34, 7, Michigan State, Undersized and doesn't check many boxes for physical traits. Scrappy blocker who struggles against size.

      246, 20, Natrell Jamerson, S, 5-10?, 201, 4.40, 7, Wisconsin, WR-turned-CB-turned-S could wear many hats to keep his NFL locker. Not ready for fulltime role.

      247, 21, Brett Toth, OT, 6-6, 305, 5.09, 7, Army, Movement skills of a TE with athleticism in pass pro. May not play until 2020 due to duty commitment.

      248, 22, Kamryn Pettway*, RB, 6-0, 235, 4.74, 7, Auburn, Strong north-south runner who could be used as an NFL fourth-quarter "closer" due to physical style.

      249, 32, Braxton Berrios, WR, 5-8?, 184, 4.52, 7, Miami, Valedictorian of UM biz school has bright future off field. Steroetipical slot WR on it and very small target.

      250, 33, Greg Stroman, CB, 5-11, 182, 4.48, 7, Virginia Tech, Good athlete avoids collisions and wants to be a cover-only perimeter cornerback.

      251, 10, Kenny Young, ILB, 6-1, 236, 4.60, 7, UCLA, Experience across the 2nd level. All-out player - almost to a fault - with 3-down skills if he can get stronger.

      252, 15, Adam Breneman, TE, 6-4, 241, 4.81, 7, UMass, 149 career receptions but history of knee injuries already prompted one retirement (2016, Penn State).

      253, 3, Johnny Townsend, P, 6-1, 209, N/A, 7-FA, Florida, Strong leg and posted 46.2-yard career average. Tends to out-kick coverage, leading to return yards.

      254, 21, Tracy Walker, S, 6-0?, 206, 4.50, 7-FA, Louisiana, Has the wingspan of a small plane and basketball body type and enough range to have a chance.

      255, 12, Brendan Mahon, OG, 6-4½, 312, 5.11, 7-FA, Penn State, Experience everywhere up front and on special teams enough to get him shot at final roster.

      256, 16, Jordan Thomas, TE, 6-5½, 265, 4.74, 7-FA, Mississippi State, JUCO product was essentially a massive wide receiver at Miss. State. Long arms, big hands, no separation.

      257, 24, Joe Ostman, DE, 6-2, 248, 4.81, 7-FA, Central Michigan, Full effort Tasmanian devil-type pass rusher with 46.5 career tackles for loss, 28.0 sacks at CMU.

      258, 23, Zachary Crabtree, OT, 6-6¼, 313, N/A, 7-FA, Oklahoma State, RT prospect with size, length combo to hold up vs. run. Heavy feet limit effectiveness blocking on move.

      259, 33, Quadree Henderson*, WR, 5-8, 190, 4.50, 7-FA, Pittsburgh, Undersized playmaker an explosive return threat and potential slot/gadget option for creative coordinator.

      260, 22, Tray Matthews, S, 6-0?, 209, 4.57, 7-FA, Auburn, Two-way college safety best when seeking contact and could wind up a special teams lifer.

      261, 12, Nic Shimonek, QB, 6-3, 220, 4.88, 7-FA, Texas Tech, Good size, accuracy as potential developmental arm. Late-game struggles and tends to stare targets down.

      262, 13, Cody O'Connell, OG, 6-8½, 363, 5.64, 7-FA, Washington State, Seasoned pass protector at left guard, ideal position in NFL is right tackle because of height, knee bend.

      263, 14, KC McDermott, OG, 6-6, 300, 5.09, 7-FA, Miami, Plus effort but limited agility and quickness force McDermott to take the long road to NFL career.

      264, 23, Ito Smith, RB, 5-9, 201, 4.48, 7-FA, Southern Miss, Averaged 5.5 yards per carry (820 attempts) thanks to sudden burst, all-direction agility.

      265, 1, Tanner Carew, LS, 6-1, 243, 5.00, 7-FA, Oregon, Seeking to become only 4th LS drafted since '10. Highly trained at position and snaps cleanly with velocity.

      266, 8, Coleman Shelton, C, 6-3, 292, 5.24, 7-FA, Washington, Lacks great play strength and anchor, but technique and experience across line could earn him reserve role.

      267, 15, Jaryd Jones-Smith, OG, 6-6½, 317, 5.22, 7-FA, Pittsburgh, Poor functional strength but looked natural as a pass protector at right tackle; worth a look.

      268, 34, Danny Johnson, CB, 5-9¼, 181, 4.44, 7-FA, Southern, Special punt return option and extra cornerback with NFL-caliber speed unlikely to contribute on D.

      269, 23, Nick Gates*, OT, 6-5?, 295, 5.46, 7-FA, Nebraska, Three-year starter at OT mirrors well, but his lack of length is a concern even with potential move to OG.

      270, 34, Richie James*, WR, 5-10, 183, 4.48, 7-FA, Middle Tennessee, Former HS QB limited to slot due to lack of size. Shifty with separation quickness and dangerous with ball.

      271, 21, James Looney, DT, 6-3, 287, 4.89, 7-FA, California, Began at Wake Forest, moved to Cal in '14. Lacks mass; may provide versatility as end/inside sub.

      272, 24, Jordan Wilkins, RB, 6-1, 217, 4.70, 7-FA, Mississippi, Served academic suspension in 2016, lead team in rushing in '17. Powerful legs, finishes runs.

      273, 22, Garret Dooley, OLB, 6-2?, 248, 4.80, 7-FA, Wisconsin, Good play strength and strong hand usage, but limited athlete may struggle to make impact in NFL.

      274, 4, Joseph Davidson, P, 6-7, 232, N/A, 7-FA, Bowling Green, Tall left-footer averaged more than 44 yards per attempt three seasons. Needs to work on hang time.

      275, 35, Deatrick Nichols, CB, 5-10, 185, 4.45, 7-FA, South Florida, Short on height and arm length to contend with NFL receivers, best inside with help over the top.

      276, 36, Kameron Kelly, CB, 6-1?, 204, 4.66, 7-FA, San Diego State, Not fast enough to play corner every down, his feet give him a chance as a utility defender.

      277, 35, Jester Weah, WR, 6-2, 210, 4.43, 7-FA, Pittsburgh, Big WR ran well at Combine, but foot speed remains big question mark. Uses body well to catch in crowds.

      278, 24, Dejon Allen, OT, 6-2, 285, N/A, FA, Hawai'i, Undersized but athletic, his NFL paycheck may come at OG due to lack of length. Versatility a big bonus.

      279, 13, Riley Ferguson, QB, 6-2¾, 212, 4.98, FA, Memphis, Former UT starter landed at Memphis after CC stint. Scans field well and is accuracte. OK arm, slight build.

      280, 37, Andre Chachere, CB, 6-0, 197, 4.49, FA, San Jose State, Needs a zone scheme and coach to light the fire to become a viable regular at cornerback.

      281, 38, Rashard Fant, CB, 5-9½, 179, 4.45, FA, Indiana, Swift and speedy with 36 starts in Big Ten, scouts worry he'll be in on plays but not finish them.

      282, 11, Christian Sam*, ILB, 6-1, 244, 4.75, FA, Arizona State, Well-built and suited for inside work, able to take on ballcarriers solo. 3-down 'backer if passion is there.

      283, 23, Dominick Sanders, S, 5-11¼, 193, 4.56, FA, Georgia, Undeniable ball skills as safety and return man with 53 starts; some view him as CB option.

      284, 25, Justin Lawler, DE, 6-3?, 265, 5.06, FA, SMU, Undeveloped rush repertoire despite results (15.5 TFLs in 2017) but has NFL body type.

      285, 3, Michael Badgley, K, 5-10, 183, 4.94, FA, Miami, Good all-around athlete was 4-year kicker. Will push for someone's job if he can improve deep accuracy.

      286, 22, Kahlil McKenzie*, DT, 6-2¾, 314, 5.15, FA, Tennessee, Son of Raiders GM Reggie; Good frame, upper-body strength, but project who doesn't play up to size.

      287, 24, Cole Reyes, S, 6-1?, 213, 4.58, FA, North Dakota, Limited speed and range and unproven against elite-level athletes. Developmental option.

      288, 36, Byron Pringle*, WR, 6-1, 205, 4.46, FA, Kansas State, Already 24, chose to leave early for pros. Averaged 24.1 YPC in 2017, but can he beat NFL press coverage?

      289, 25, Joshua Kalu, S, 6-0, 203, 4.58, FA, Nebraska, Capable of lining up at safety, cornerback and nickel with good instincts and study habits to stick.

      290, 12, Joel Iyiegbuniwe*, ILB, 6-1, 229, 4.60, FA, Western Kentucky, Made NFL jump after 1st-team all-conference season. Good athlete in coverage but gets stuck on blocks.

      291, 37, Jake Wieneke, WR, 6-4, 221, 4.67, FA, South Dakota State, Lack of speed is main detriment for big, long WR. Quality route-runner who could be dangerous in red zone.

      292, 23, Ja'Von Rolland-Jones, OLB, 6-2, 215, 4.88, FA, North Dakota, FBS' all-time sack leader (42) brings hustle, but low level of competition flags enhanced by poor workouts.

      293, 23, Lowell Lotulelei, DT, 6-1?, 315, N/A, FA, Utah, Former frosh All-American fell off table in '17. Questions about desire, work ethic may leave him undrafted.

      294, 16, Sam Jones*, OG, 6-4?, 290, 5.30, FA, Arizona State, Left school early after coach was fired and has enough athletic upside to warrant late-round flier.

      295, 17, K.J. Malone, OG, 6-4, 303, 5.34, FA, LSU, Son of NBA HOF'er Karl Malone has the frame, feet to stay outside but requires significant polish.

      296, 24, Jamiyus Pittman, DT, 6-1, 284, N/A, FA, Central Florida, Played outside for Scott Frost; short, stout prospect projects best inside. More effort than upside talent.

      297, 13, Chris Worley, ILB, 6-1?, 238, 4.86, FA, Ohio State, Timed speed matches the film and plays stiff. Does bring strong intangibles and strikes ballcarriers hard.

      298, 26, Sean Chandler, S, 5-10½, 205, 4.61, FA, Temple, Tweener who could find a path forward due to versatile experience at CB and S, special teams ability.

      299, 14, Logan Woodside, QB, 6-1, 201, 4.79, FA, Toledo, Lack of size will take him off many draft boards. Needs right offense to maximize football IQ, accuracy.

      300, 14, Jason Cabinda, ILB, 6-1, 239, N/A, FA, Penn State, Willing chaser and tackler was 3-year starter, but limited athleticism will leave him fighting for roster spot.

      --Field Level Media

  • Titans exercise option on Mariota's contract
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    The Tennessee Titans officially picked up the fifth-year option of quarterback Marcus Mariota's contract on Tuesday, according to published reports.

    • Titans general manager Jon Robinson indicated last Wednesday that the club would be exercising the option during a radio interview.

      The transaction gives Mariota just over $20.9 million in salary in 2019. He is slated to make $3.73 million this season.

      Picking up the option also gives both sides more time to negotiate a long-term contract for the 24-year-old Mariota.

      Mariota guided Tennessee to its first playoff victory since the 2003 campaign last season despite an uneven year in which he passed for 3,232 yards and 13 touchdowns against a career-worst 15 interceptions.

      In 2016, he passed for career highs of 3,426 yards and 26 touchdowns against a career low of nine interceptions.

      Overall, he has passed for 9,476 yards, 58 touchdowns and 34 interceptions in 42 NFL games.

      Mariota was the second overall pick in 2015 after a standout college career at Oregon. He won the Heisman Trophy in 2014.

      --Field Level Media

  • Shurmur: WR Beckham 'absolutely' part of Giants in '18
    By Field Level Media / Tuesday, April 24, 2018

    New York Giants head coach Pat Shurmur maintains that wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. will be part of the team next season.

    • Shurmur said during his pre-draft press conference Tuesday that Beckham "absolutely" will be with the Giants in 2018. Reports last month had New York shopping the talented wide receiver in trade talks, with owner John Mara not ruling out the possibility of a trade entirely.

      "Do I want him to be traded? Absolutely not," Mara told reporters at the NFL owner's meetings last month. "I want him to be a Giant. I can't promise that's going to happen. We're not looking to get rid of him, OK?''

      Meanwhile, Shurmur said Tuesday he's been in consistent communication with the 25-year-old this offseason.

      "We constantly communicate, we had a great conversation yesterday," Shurmur said. "He came in and we sat down as we were getting ready for this minicamp so we could talk about what we were trying to get accomplished. We've spoken on the phone, we text, it's just like any relationship. We're very honest and open with one another and we communicate frequently.

      "He's an excellent player, he's part of our team and he's a very valued member of our team. Everybody that's out here, I'm planning on them being here."

      Beckham isn't physically ready to take part in the Giants' minicamp, but he is in attendance for the voluntary event and was involved in Tuesday morning's walk-through. Beckham was also present for OTAs earlier this month.

      Beckham was limited to four games last season because of ankle injuries. The wideout underwent surgery on his fractured left ankle in October and said at the time he expects to be back "better than ever" in 2018.

      --Field Level Media